A Look Back at Internet of Things' Origin, Evolution

A Look Back at Internet of Things' Origin, Evolution
Tim Berners-Lee
Internet Toaster
'Internet of Things' Coined
MQ Telemetry Transport
IoT Refrigerator
The Ambient Orb
The United Nations
Kickoff Conference
Connected Car
Bluetooth Low Energy
Nest Labs Home Automation
Device-to-Device Communication
Lumoback App Sensor
Google Glass
Google Making IoT Moves
Apple HomeKit and HealthKit
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A Look Back at Internet of Things' Origin, Evolution

By Darryl K. Taft

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Tim Berners-Lee

In 1989, Tim Berners-Lee invents the World Wide Web.

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Internet Toaster

In 1990, John Romkey and Simon Hackett create the first connected device—a toaster powered by the Internet.

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'Internet of Things' Coined

In 1999, Kevin Ashton coins the term "Internet of things" and founds MIT's Auto-ID Center, the leading global research network of academic laboratories in the field of Internet of things.

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MQ Telemetry Transport

In 1999, MQTT (MQ Telemetry Transport)—the first machine-to-machine (M2M) standardization protocol designed for connected devices—is invented by Dr. Andy Stanford-Clark of IBM and Arlen Nipper of Arcom (now Eurotech).

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IoT Refrigerator

In 2000, LG announces plans for the first Internet of things refrigerator. The fridge is programmed to sense what kinds of products are being stored inside it and keep a track of the stock through barcode or RFID scanning.

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The Ambient Orb

In 2002, the Ambient Orb, created by David Rose and others, launches to the public. The Orb monitors the Dow Jones, personal portfolios, weather and other data sources and changes its color based on the dynamic parameters.

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The United Nations

In 2005, the United Nations first mentions IoT in a published International Telecommunications Union report.

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Kickoff Conference

In 2008, the first international conference for IoT is held in Zurich.

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Connected Car

In 2010, Google kicks off the self-driving vehicle project, a major milestone in the future development of the connected car.

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Bluetooth Low Energy

In 2010, originally launched under the name Wibree by Nokia in 2006, Bluetooth Low Energy, a wireless personal area network technology aimed at novel applications in the health care, fitness, security and home entertainment industries, is merged into the main Bluetooth standard.

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Nest Labs Home Automation

In 2011, Nest Labs, a home automation company that designs and manufactures sensor-driven, WiFi-enabled, self-learning, programmable thermostats and smoke detectors, introduces its first product, the Nest Learning Thermostat.

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Device-to-Device Communication

In 2011, Qualcomm launches Alljoyn, a peer-to-peer technology framework that enables ad-hoc, proximity-based device-to-device communication without the use of an intermediary server.

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Lumoback App Sensor

In 2012, Lumoback, a well-known app sensor that helps fix posture, launches a Kickstarter—raising over $200,500—and begins to ship out its product.

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Google Glass

In 2013, Google Glass, wearable technology controlled through voice recognition software and a touchpad built into the side, is released to developers.

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Google Making IoT Moves

In 2014, Google acquires Nest Labs for $3.2 billion.

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Apple HomeKit and HealthKit

In 2014, Apple announces HomeKit and HealthKit, two major developments in the health and home security space.

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