Imagine 3D Video Without Those Annoying Red-Blue Glasses

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1 of 8

Imagine 3D Video Without Those Annoying Red-Blue Glasses

Imagine 3-D Video Without Those Annoying Red-Blue Glasses

2 of 8

No Title

A 42-inch LED display screen in the window of an unoccupied retail store on Seventh Avenue and 50th Street in Manhattan causes groups of people to stop, look and wonder. The display shows looped videos of a rotating Snickers bar and a moving Intel logo. What's different about this is that it is a 3-dimensional display that doesn't require viewers to wear red-and-blue glasses to see the 3D effect. (Photo courtesy of Alioscopy)

3 of 8

No Title

Three-dimensional graphics don't translate to two-dimensional media very well, but an augmented photo of butterflies coming through the screen isn't far from what viewers experience in autostereoscopic 3D. (Photo courtesy of Alioscopy)

4 of 8

No Title

Another example of Alioscopy's autostereoscopic 3D is this photo depicting coins coming out of the screen.(Photo courtesy of Alioscopy)

5 of 8

No Title

At the Autodesk Gallery display in San Francisco, this rotating multicolored purse looked real enough to take shopping to nearby Fisherman's Wharf. (Photo by Chris Preimesberger, eWEEK)

6 of 8

No Title

A Budweiser beer bottle looked real enough to grab and pop open. (Photo by Chris Preimesberger, eWEEK)

7 of 8

No Title

Alioscopy CEO Philippe Roche (left) and Vincent Brisebois, designer of Autodesk's Toxik product, take a break at the Autodesk Gallery presentation in San Francisco. (Photo by Chris Preimesberger, eWEEK)

8 of 8

No Title

Top White Papers and Webcasts