Microsoft Expands Access to Windows Source Code

All Most Valued Professionals within the Microsoft platforms community and living within the 27 eligible countries worldwide will now be able to access Windows source code at no cost.

Microsoft Corp. has expanded the Source Licensing Program under which its Most Valued Professionals get access to the source code for the Windows operating system.

The Redmond, Wash., company said on Monday that all the MVPs within the Microsoft platforms community and living within the 27 eligible countries worldwide will now be able to access Windows source code at no cost.

The source code provided under the program covers Microsoft Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 and future versions of Windows operating systems, including all released versions, service packs, betas and subsequent releases.

MVPs, who are chosen for having a "unique set of expertise and passion" around Microsoft technologies and who are recognized for their contributions to online and technical communities, already have access to the source code components for Windows CE .Net, ASP .Net, Visual Studio .Net and Passport Manager.

Microsofts Shared Source Initiative was first reported by eWEEK in March 2001, and the Redmond, Wash., software titan has been expanding it since then.

/zimages/4/28571.gifFor Microsofts list of shared-source licensing options, click here.

This latest move expands on Microsofts announcement last October that some MVPs living in certain countries and working in the Microsoft platforms community can access Windows source code at no cost.

"This provides a great opportunity for these individuals to differentiate themselves professionally as Windows platforms experts. Today, Microsoft is expanding the eligibility of the MVP SLP to all MVPs living in eligible countries," a Microsoft spokeswoman told eWEEK.

MVPs have become one of the most active participants in the Shared Source program, and the move now allows an even larger community of MVPs to offer quality help for people developing, deploying and securing Windows environments, she said.

Next Page: Sharing Windows CE source code.