10 Features We Want to See in an Apple Big-Screen Television

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10 Features We Want to See in an Apple Big-Screen Television

For years there were recurring rumors that Apple was developing a high-end line of televisions after Steve Jobs said he thought he had found a way to create a groundbreaking set. But the television idea fell by the wayside as Apple decided to focus on smartphones, tablets and other products. On Aug. 16, however, reports surfaced that Apple might be secretly testing a television. While it’s impossible to know for sure what Apple has planned, there are some features it must have to be successful if the company is thinking about a television. By taking cues from its Apple TV set-top box, as well as its recently unveiled HomePod, Apple’s television could deliver features to help it stand out in the marketplace. Here are the top features it should have.

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Give Us Big Screens, Please

According to reports, Apple could be testing a 60-inch television. But that’s an odd size for OLED panels. If Apple actually launches a television, it should consider offering several big screen sizes from 55 to even 90 inches, because for some customers, the sky is the limit for screen sizes.

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It Must Rely on OLED Technology

It would make no sense for Apple to build a television with anything other than organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology. OLED is the best screen technology on the market, offering crystal clear pictures, thin designs and low power consumption. It's inconceivable Apple will release a television without OLED.

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High-Quality Stereo Sound

Apple noted that it built high-quality speakers into its HomePod smart home hub. The company should do the same with a possible television. While some customers prefer separate, dedicated speakers for their home entertainment, others like built-in speakers. Apple needs to cater to that preference.

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Apple’s Siri Should Be Built In

It's essential for Apple to bundle its Siri virtual assistant with any television it offers. With Siri, the television’s users could ask the set to turn on a channel, switch inputs and access apps. In fact, Siri should be able to do anything on an Apple television that it can do on an iPhone.

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Apple's tvOS Would Make Sense

On the software side, Apple should bundle tvOS in its television. The operating system, which currently runs the Apple TV, works well and includes some nice built-in apps such as Apple Music and iTunes, which would be essential on a new television from Apple. There’s no need for Apple to reinvent the wheel on software.

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Include Heavy Third-Party App Support

To attract as many users as possible, it’s important to attract third-party developers. Apple should be able to bring third-party apps already running on tvOS to the television without trouble. However, Apple would need to boost its reliance on developers and ultimately get as many apps to the TV as possible.

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Improve Upon the Siri Remote

Apple’s Siri Remote is a nice step forward in its use of touch-screens and voice commands to control televisions or set-top boxes. However, it doesn’t have many of the things users might expect from a television remote, including channel buttons or number keys. A bigger—and better—Siri Remote is a must.

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It Could Work as a Smart-Home Hub

Apple has been moving deeper into the smart-home market with HomeKit and its new hub, HomePod. But the Apple television could also act as a smart-home hub, allowing users to control smart thermostats, lighting and other products around the house. With Siri support, adding smart-home control would be a simple option.

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Remember the Corporate User

The Apple television should be designed so it could be used in the corporate world with ease. It should have a conference room setting with AirPlay mirroring so employees could share their iPhone or Mac screens with others. Apple also should consider bundling a FaceTime HD camera into the television for video conferencing.

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Keep the Price Reasonable

If Apple were to deliver all of these features, its television would be expensive. But Apple needs to keep pricing in check. Apple’s television could cost several thousand dollars and still be successful. But the television market is very competitive, even considering Apple’s cache. The sweet spot for high-end television pricing is between $2,500 and $5,000, if Samsung and LG televisions are the benchmark.

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