10 Reasons Not to Buy the Apple MacBook Pro

10 Reasons Not to Buy the Apple MacBook Pro
The CPU Isn't Market-Leading
This Won't Compete With Graphics-Heavy Competitors
There's a Lack of 'Pro' Features
Where's the Touch Screen?
The Ports Are a Disappointment
The Cost Is High
Customers Will Need Accessories
Battery Life Could Be Better
It's Impossible to Repair
Competitors Are Outstanding
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10 Reasons Not to Buy the Apple MacBook Pro

While Apple's latest MacBook Pro boasts Touch ID to enhance security and a new Touch Bar, it may not resonate well with prospective customers. Here's why.

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The CPU Isn't Market-Leading

Apple's MacBook Pro comes standard with an Intel Core i5 processor on the 13-inch models and Intel Core i7 on 15-inch options. Many market analysts noted that Apple's processor choices were a little anemic compared with higher-end i7s found in competing computers. While the latest MacBook Pro is more powerful than its predecessor, in a race against high-end notebooks, it's trailing many competitors—including devices from Lenovo's Yoga line and several boutique vendors.

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This Won't Compete With Graphics-Heavy Competitors

Similarly, Apple's MacBook Pro comes with either Intel Iris graphics or the Radeon Pro 450 or 455 out of the box. Again, those GPUs are somewhat powerful and nice improvements over the chips in the previous MacBook Pro, but they can't compete with higher-end GeForce chips in many Windows-based competitors. Gamers and creatives might find a better solution elsewhere.

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There's a Lack of 'Pro' Features

Critics have been outspoken about the MacBook Pro's rather un-pro-like features. This is a computer that ships with 16GB of RAM, at most. While that's fine for consumers, for professional users or the creatives Apple is trying to target, it's not enough. Add that to the lack of an SD card slot and just minor innovations to core components such as the screen, keyboard and touchpad, and it doesn't feel like a "pro" device.

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Where's the Touch Screen?

Apple executives have said in several interviews of late that the company has no interest in adding a touch screen to its notebooks and is content with the Touch Bar. However, several Windows-based competitors, including the Surface Book, are now bundling touch screens, and sales suggest the feature is a must-have for many customers. Apple's decision to eschew a touch screen might make the MacBook Pro a little less appealing compared with competitors.

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The Ports Are a Disappointment

Apple said at its press event that its decision to include four Thunderbolt 3 ports in the MacBook Pro reflects its desire to keep up with the pace of innovation. However, many consumers are not pleased with Apple's decision, saying the company should have included standard USB ports, an SD card slot and other ports in the MacBook Pro. After all, similarly thin and high-end competitors from Dell and Acer, among other companies, offer those ports. Why can't Apple?

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The Cost Is High

The Touch Bar-equipped MacBook Pro starts at $1,799 and $1,999 for the two 13-inch models. On the 15-inch side, customers can expect to pay $2,399 and $2,799. Any customization to the MacBook Pro will send its already high price soaring. Not everyone is willing to spend so much money on a notebook—especially when comparably equipped options in the Windows world are available at much lower prices.

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Customers Will Need Accessories

In addition to paying thousands for a MacBook Pro, customers should expect to spend a considerable amount in adapters that will let them connect accessories to the computer. Apple's decision to offer only Thunderbolt 3 ports in the MacBook Pro means anyone running a USB external hard drive or certain displays will need an adapter to use them with Apple's new computer. It might not take much for the MacBook Pro's total cost of ownership to soar after customers realize the accessories they want to use won't work without an adapter.

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Battery Life Could Be Better

Apple says its MacBook Pro can deliver 10 hours of battery life when continually surfing the internet or watching movies. While that's not necessarily bad, it's not industry-leading, either. Several competitors come with much longer battery life. The Microsoft Surface Book, for instance, promises up to 16 hours of battery life on a single charge. Apple needs to catch up on the battery side to appeal to power users who expect something better.

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It's Impossible to Repair

Some notebook owners like the idea of easily repairing simple notebook problems or updating the machine with new components when the time is right. Those folks will be out of luck with the MacBook Pro. Apple's computer is nearly impossible to open and doesn't offer any access to its motherboard or important components for upgrading. In true Apple form, this is a locked-down computer that won't deliver the level of repairability and upgrade ease many have enjoyed on the Windows side.

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Competitors Are Outstanding

Given these shortcomings, some might be wondering what else is out there. And unfortunately for Apple, there's quite a bit out there. The MacBook Pro is competing with outstanding competitors, including Alienware's many high-end machines and some of Lenovo's professional-use notebooks in the ThinkPad line. Even Microsoft's Surface Book is a nice alternative. Apple's MacBook Pro is nice, but it's going to find a highly competitive market when it hits store shelves.

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