Apples 30th Anniversary

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Apples 30th Anniversary

What did eWEEK Labs think about the current release of the Mac operating system when it first came out? In this case well let the review speak for itself: App

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

The rackable Xserve goes 64-bit with dual G5 processors, providing a lot of Mac computing power at a reasonable cost.

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

The Apple Power Mac G5 was one of the first desktop-oriented 64-bit systems that we had tested. In fact, for this roundup, we had a hard time finding an Athlon-based

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

A significant upgrade, Panther added improved networking capabilities. But, more importantly for usability, it added the Expose feature, which has led to Mac users co

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

Once again, we were impressed with Apples foray into enterprise-class server devices, but once again we found that the companys Mac-only focus would make Xserve RAI

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

Still one of the only moves that Apple has made toward the enterprise market, the rackable Xserver impressed us with its ease of use and good capabilities.

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

As we said at the time, Mac and server were two words that didnt traditionally go well together. But now that it was essentially BSD Unix with an excellent graphical shell, Mac OS proved in <a href=/

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

At the time, we thought Mac OS X 10.2 was a worthwhile upgrade for its improved performance and networking capability. In retrospect, the OS turned out to be a fairly

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

Though it was still called a Macintosh OS, OS X was a completely different beast then its predecessors, with its underlying Unix architecture that completely changed the strengths and weaknesses of the Mac platform--mainly for the better. At the time of <

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

Its still in extremely wide use for every Mac user who has been unwilling or unable to upgrade to a system that can run Mac OS X or who has needed to run legacy Mac applications. The biggest improvement at the time was its ability to finally handle TCP/I

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

When we tested these updated and slim PowerBooks, we concluded that, for many users, they could substitute for a desktop and be the only Mac that they needed.

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

It sure was cute, though not quite the revolution in all-in-one computers that some portrayed it as. At the moment it was released, the iMac was an impressive piece of computing, especially at its price point. But the lack of expandability would prove dam

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

We still occasionally see people using these G3-powered PowerBooks, which were among the first Mac laptops in the Labs that the PC guys kept wanting to play with.

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

The first handheld computer to really capture the publics imagination, the Newton MessagePad impressed us with its ground-breaking capabilities. Though it would become the butt of jokes for its poor handwriting recognition, the Newton would stay in use f

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

If the trackpad is your favored method of cursor control on a laptop, then the release of the PowerBook 500 was a groundbreaking moment in mobile computing history. The first laptop to use a trackpad, the PowerBook 500 was also an impressively powerful mo

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

In our System 7 Pro review, we were very impressed with the PowerTalk messaging system but didnt think AppleScript would be popular with users. Of course, AppleScript is still in use today and, what was the name of that messaging system?

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

In this roundup of early PowerBooks, we found the PowerBook 140 to be the best overall option, with the PowerBook 170 the best choice for those able to pay for performance and the PowerBook 100 suitable strictly for entry-level use.

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

The classic pizza-box Macs such as the LC II, while uninspiring to us at the time, would prove to have remarkable staying power, especially in education environments where they remained a fixture for many years.

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Apples 30th Anniversary Test

The fastest Mac ever delivered. It wouldnt be the last time we would say that, but it was certainly true that the workstation-class Quadra 900 was a must-have system for Mac users who craved speed and power.

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