Dell Introduces Chromebook Tuned for Business Users

Today's topics include the launch of Dell's Premium Chromebook for Business users, new features on Microsoft's enterprise social networking platform Yammer, the return of the Android Stagefright flaw, and a delay in the arrival of Appleā€™s rumored live streaming television services.

Dell has unveiled the Chromebook 13, the company's first premium-level business Chromebook that incorporates features and security required by enterprise users.

The new device has a 13.3-inch display, a choice of processors up to fifth-generation Intel Core i5 CPUs, battery life of up to 12 hours and more.

The Chromebook 13 runs on the Google Chrome operating system and includes manageability tools, security software and applications that support business users. The devices will be available starting Sept. 17 in the United States and Canada.

Yammer, Microsoft's enterprise social networking platform, will soon sport new features, an updated interface and notification capabilities, all aimed at improving team collaboration and productivity.

Yammer's Web interface's home feed will be renamed Discovery, delivering content and updates from relevant groups and other teams.

A new real-time indicator alerts users to group activity regardless of where they are in Yammer. A Next Group notification prompts users to navigate to another group to try to prevent projects or important tasks from falling through the cracks.

Among the big stories to break at the Black Hat USA conference this year was the Android security vulnerabilities in the Stagefright media library, impacting 950 million users.

Google claimed last week that it had fixed the Stagefright flaws, but new research from security firm Exodus Intelligence now alleges otherwise.

As of Aug. 14, Google has actually made an open-source patch available for the issue. Although Google does not deny the fact that the issue still exists, the company claims that the risk to users is not very high.

The development of Apple's rumored live streaming television services is running behind schedule due to slower-than-expected negotiations with TV networks for their video content.

The slow negotiations mean that the live Apple TV service will now arrive in 2016, rather than in September 2015, as previously expected, according to an Aug. 13 report by Bloomberg.

Apple was expected to announce the upcoming service at a Sept. 9 product briefing in San Francisco, but those plans have been scrapped, according to Bloomberg.

However, the company is still planning to introduce the next version of its Apple TV set-top box at that event, according to the report.

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