At IDF, PCs Take a Back Seat to Drones, VR, AI, Driverless Cars

 
 
By Jeffrey Burt  |  Posted 2016-08-25
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    1 - At IDF, PCs Take a Back Seat to Drones, VR, AI, Driverless Cars
    Next

    At IDF, PCs Take a Back Seat to Drones, VR, AI, Driverless Cars

    This year's Intel Developer Forum had a decidedly different flavor to it—with fewer PCs but more drones, cars and other connected devices on display.
  • Previous
    2 - Virtual Reality in the Real World
    Next

    Virtual Reality in the Real World

    Krzanich introduced Project Alloy, a push to create an entirely self-contained virtual reality (VR) headset that doesn't need exterior sensors or to be tethered via a wire to a PC. All the compute, graphics, batteries and modules, as well as technologies like RealSense, are contained in the headset.
  • Previous
    3 - Project Alloy Takes Center Stage
    Next

    Project Alloy Takes Center Stage

    Krzanich, left, and Intel's Craig Raymond show the VR headset. It's part of what Krzanich called "merged reality," or the ability to bring physical objects into the virtual world, and vice versa. The demonstration showed Raymond viewing a virtual world through a headset, being able to see his hands and other physical objects, and manipulating the environment using those objects.
  • Previous
    4 - Microsoft and Intel Put Focus on VR
    Next

    Microsoft and Intel Put Focus on VR

    Terry Myerson, right, executive vice president of Microsoft's Windows and Devices Group, said the software maker will update Windows 10 to enable the company's Windows Holographic software that runs on its HoloLens to also run on the Alloy headsets. In December, the companies will announce a spec for VR headsets like Alloy and Microsoft's HoloLens, and next year, Intel will open-source the Alloy hardware.
  • Previous
    5 - The Music of Merged Reality
    Next

    The Music of Merged Reality

    Before Krzanich took the stage, musicians—such as this drummer—played music using Intel's VR headset and software, with drums that could be seen and played via the headset but were not physically in front of the musician.
  • Previous
    6 - Intel Takes to the Air
    Next

    Intel Takes to the Air

    Krzanich continued what has become standard at Intel events by showing off drones that use such Intel products as processors and RealSense 3D camera technology. Here the CEO shows off an Aero Ready to Fly drone, a fully assembled quadcopter on which developers can launch their applications.
  • Previous
    7 - Intel Drones On
    Next

    Intel Drones On

    Intel's Jeff Lo demonstrates a ready-to-fly drone that uses the company's Aero Compute Board and RealSense technology, which can be used to help the system navigate environments and avoid collisions.
  • Previous
    8 - Intel Also Stays on the Ground
    Next

    Intel Also Stays on the Ground

    Autonomous cars continue to be a key focus for most chip makers, including Intel, which recently announced a partnership with BMW and Mobileye to get self-driving BMW vehicles on the road by 2021. At IDF, Intel officials said the company is building its own fleet of autonomous cars, and put two test vehicles on display.
  • Previous
    9 - Behind the Wheel of a Self-Driving Car
    Next

    Behind the Wheel of a Self-Driving Car

    Software will be crucial to the development and performance of autonomous cars. Here, an IDF attendee tries out a natural human-machine interface (HMI) prototype platform for self-driving cars.
  • Previous
    10 - It's Fun to Play With the FPGA
    Next

    It's Fun to Play With the FPGA

    Intel last year paid $16.7 billion to acquire Altera and its programmable chip technology. At IDF, Krzanich and other officials stressed the importance of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in the fast-growing digital world. Here the CEO shows off an Intel-branded 14-nanometer Stratix 10 FPGA during the inaugural Intel SoC (system-on-a-chip) FPGA Developer Forum, run in conjunction with IDF.
  • Previous
    11 - The Power and Energy of Joule
    Next

    The Power and Energy of Joule

    Intel introduced a chip module called Joule, a tiny board with sensors based on RealSense, that will make it easier for developers to create prototypes of devices that include computer vision capabilities. It complements other such Intel development boards like Edison, Galileo and Curie. Here Krzanich displays a Joule board.
  • Previous
    12 - Joule in Action
    Next

    Joule in Action

    At IDF, there were numerous devices on display that use the Joule development board, such as safety glasses and small robots with computer vision. Here, a user looks through a helmet heads-up display by EyeLights powered by Joule.
  • Previous
    13 - Intel Bringing Silicon Photonics to Data Centers
    Next

    Intel Bringing Silicon Photonics to Data Centers

    Diane Bryant, executive vice president and general manager of Intel's Data Center Group, announced that after 16 years of development, the company was ready to bring silicon photonics products to market later this year. The technology will address the demand by cloud service providers for more network bandwidth, better scalability and faster connectivity.
  • Previous
    14 - Keeping an Eye on 5G
    Next

    Keeping an Eye on 5G

    Venkata "Murthy" Renduchintala, president of Intel's Client and IoT Businesses and Systems Architecture Group, told IDF attendees that a key part of the vendor's IoT strategy is focusing on the development and deployment of 5G, the upcoming next-generation wireless broadband technology that promises to deliver speeds 10 to 100 times faster than average 4G LTE connections today.
  • Previous
    15 - Many Cores and AI
    Next

    Many Cores and AI

    Artificial intelligence and machine learning is fast becoming another highly competitive field for chip makers. At IDF, Intel's Bryant said that next year, the company will introduce "Knights Mill"—a derivative of Intel's current many-core Xeon Phi "Knights Landing" chip that will compete with Nvidia's GPUs in machine learning tasks.
 

Intel, long the most dominant chip vendor for PCs, is making a high-profile transition away from them and toward such growth markets as the internet of things (IoT), drones, the cloud, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, virtual and augmented reality, network connectivity and the data center. Essentially, the company wants the billions of connected devices that will make up the IoT to run on Intel technology, and for its products to drive the systems that connect them to the cloud. "We are transforming into the company that is powering the cloud, connecting smart devices and making new experiences possible based on all that today," Intel CEO Brian Krzanich told the more than 6,000 people who traveled to San Francisco last week for the annual Intel Developer Forum (IDF). In the past, the show had been packed with new PCs and servers powered by the company's latest and greater processors. However, this year's IDF had a decidedly different vibe to it, with fewer PCs on display and more drones, cars and other connected devices on the floor. This slide show takes a look at some of the highlights from this year's IDF. (Photos courtesy of Intel)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel