HP Pavilion Wave's Triangular Design Takes Desktops Beyond the Box

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2016-09-02
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    HP Pavilion Wave's Triangular Design Takes Desktops Beyond the Box
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    HP Pavilion Wave's Triangular Design Takes Desktops Beyond the Box

    HP didn't give its Pavilion Wave a triangular design just for aesthetic reasons. It better disperses heat through the system and delivers immersive audio experiences. Here's what makes the Wave a nice home computer option.
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    Pavilion Wave Takes Another Approach to Desktop Design
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    Pavilion Wave Takes Another Approach to Desktop Design

    The HP Pavilion Wave has a design unlike most others. The computer comes with a triangular look that's designed to disperse heat through the system. In addition, the device's exterior is covered in "audio fabric" that makes it look like a small speaker on the desk. There's also a plastic cap atop the computer that helps audio and warm air to escape.
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    It's a Windows 10 Home Computer
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    It's a Windows 10 Home Computer

    The HP Pavilion Wave PC will run Windows 10 Home out of the box rather than Windows Pro. For corporate customers looking for the "Pro" experience, the HP Pavilion Wave might not be the right desktop model.
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    There Are High-End Processor Options
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    There Are High-End Processor Options

    Although the HP Pavilion Wave starts out at a relatively low price, that price can quickly soar if users want more processing power. According to the company, the Pavilion Wave can be configured with up to a sixth-generation Intel Core i7 quad-core processor. No clock speeds have been announced, but you can expect the PC will deliver plenty of power to run any application most home users want to use.
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    The Graphics Power Is Surprising
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    The Graphics Power Is Surprising

    There might not be much room inside the Pavilion Wave PC, but that doesn't mean it has to be lacking in power. In fact, HP noted that customers will be able to upgrade its graphics chip with an AMD Radeon R9 M470 chip. Microsoft, which helped HP introduce the computer, says it'll work well for "photo and video editing or light gaming."
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    There Are Big-Scale Storage Options
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    There Are Big-Scale Storage Options

    When choosing the storage in the Pavilion Wave PC, customers will have some options. According to HP, the computer will ship with up to 2TB of storage on a hard disk drive. Those who want faster performance but less storage can opt for a 128GB solid-state drive.
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    Enough Ports to Get the Job Done
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    Enough Ports to Get the Job Done

    The HP Wave might be small, but it comes with a large number of ports. The device will ship with three USB 3.0 ports, as well as one USB 3.1 Type-C port for data transfer compatibility. Plus, there are an HDMI port, one DisplayPort and Gigabit Ethernet. There's also a combination microphone/headphone jack.
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    The Design Improves Audio Performance
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    The Design Improves Audio Performance

    The idea behind HP's design is to deliver better audio performance than traditional desktops. One reason for the improved audio performance is professionals at Bang & Olufsen have tuned the speakers to deliver better audio quality. Once sound is emitted, it's pushed up through the top of the desktop, where it can travel 360 degrees, delivering what HP says is better sound than competing devices.
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    It's Not Easy to Keep the Wave Cool
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    It's Not Easy to Keep the Wave Cool

    Since the desktop comes with an angular design and is wrapped in fabric, HP needed to help the Pavilion Wave breathe. To do so, the company says that it has "optimized" the device's layout. Each side contains different components, including the motherboard, processor, graphics card and others. One side also comes with a thermal system that has copper pipes designed to extract heat and move it across cooling fins that push it out the top.
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    HP Wants Wave to Be a Home Entertainment Computer
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    HP Wants Wave to Be a Home Entertainment Computer

    The HP Pavilion Wave might be a desktop, but it was also designed to fit nicely in the living room where users can connect it to an HDTV or 4K TV. In fact, the computer comes with full support for 4K displays. Users can also use it as a media-streaming hub by connecting it to the television, and thanks to its Bluetooth support, it can be paired with Bluetooth speakers for multiroom music listening.
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    It's an Affordable Computer
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    It's an Affordable Computer

    HP's Pavilion Wave will be available both on HP.com and at select retailers starting Sept. 23. Prices start at an affordable $550 for a lower-end models, but quickly go up as users add higher-end components. Still, the Pavilion Wave should be affordable for those who want a well-appointed home computer with some nice features.
 

HP Inc. on Aug. 31 unveiled a new computer called the Pavilion Wave. The desktop PC, which will launch later in September, comes in a small triangular package that's designed to deliver immersive audio experiences. The computer, which looks more like a speaker than a desktop PC, runs on Windows 10 and supports 4K displays. It's yet another PC designed to make people forget the boring boxes and towers that encouraged buyers to ignore the desktop market altogether in recent years. With the Pavilion Wave, users will also find several tucked-away USB ports as well as an HDMI port designed to connect the computer to a television. Despite its consumer focus, the Pavilion Wave is no slouch on power. Customers can buy up to the sixth-generation Intel Core i7 processor and include up to 16GB of memory in the machine to keep apps running smoothly. Perhaps most importantly for those who want high-end performance, the computer even boasts support for the AMD Radeon R9 M470 graphics chip. Altogether, these features will make the Pavilion Wave a nice computer for the home.

 
 
 
 
 
Don Reisinger is a freelance technology columnist. He started writing about technology for Ziff-Davis' Gearlog.com. Since then, he has written extremely popular columns for CNET.com, Computerworld, InformationWeek, and others. He has appeared numerous times on national television to share his expertise with viewers. You can follow his every move at http://twitter.com/donreisinger.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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