eWEEK is the essential technology information source for builders of enterprise infrastructure. eWEEK enables readers to successfully evaluate, deploy and leverage new technology solutions for competitive advantage. eWeek's publication delivers to its rea

 
 
By eweek  |  Posted 2003-05-28
 
 
 

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

Introduced on Monday, August 7, at Apples Worldwide Developers Conference, the Intel-based Mac Pro bears a striking resemblance to its PowerPC G5 predecessor. Apple expanded its front-side array of ports; it now provides FireWire 400 and 800 connections

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

From the back of box, we can see the expansion connectors and the networking ports. A latch on the left hand side unlocks the side panel for access. Along the top of the new Mac Pro chassis are four direct-attached SATA (Serial ATA) storage bays, each wit

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

The new Mac workstation supports 8GB of RAM in each of two bays (16GB total), and above, three full-length PCI Express cards. To the left of the RAM cage is an unmarked section for the pair of Xeon processors. No Intel Inside sticker he

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

Instead of connecting drives with cables, the new Mac Pro uses caddies that click into place on the logic board. Users can purchase extra carriers for backup or for RAID setups.

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

The new Mac Pro supports up to 16GB of RAM using two memory riser cards. Each card provides four DIMM slots for 667MHz fully buffered ECC RAM.

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

The riser card for the memory cage in Apples new Mac Pro workstation has four slots for DIMMs. Apple is selling the DIMMs with a little heat sink, which it says lets the internal cooling fans run more slowly (and quietly) but still provide enough cooling

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

The new Mac Pro can handle a double-wide, 16-lane PCI Express graphics card. In the PowerMac G5, the larger card gets in the way of one of the PCI Express card slots. But the new model lets users pack three cards and the larger video cards.

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

Apple product manager Scott Forstall demonstrates the Time Machine feature in the upcoming version of the Mac OS X, nicknamed Leopard. Time Machine allows users to go back in time to previous folders in order to locate a copy o

WWDC 2006: Mac Pro Desktop, Mac OS Leopard

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