Nvidia Delivers Eclipse-based IDE for GPU Computing on Linux, Mac OS

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-05-14
 
 
 

Nvidia has announced a new Eclipse-based integrated development environment for GPU computing on Linux and Mac OS.

The new Nvidia Nsight, Eclipse Edition is the world€™s first IDE for developing GPU-accelerated applications on Linux- and Mac OS-based systems, the company claims. Graphical processor maker Nvidia introduced its new technology on May 14 at the GPU Technology Conference in San Jose, Calif.

Nvidia Nsight provides debugging and profiling tools that enable high-performance computing (HPC) and graphics developers to fully optimize the performance of CPUs and GPUs.

Moreover, the new Nsight, Eclipse Edition, enables CUDA programmers to easily develop, debug and optimize the performance of GPU-accelerated applications within a familiar IDE based on the open-source Eclipse framework.

Key features of the new product include automatic code refactoring, which helps convert slow sequential CPU loops into parallel GPU kernels. Nvidia Nsight also features an integrated expert analysis system, which provides automated performance analysis and step-by-step guidance to address application performance bottlenecks. The development environment provides syntax highlighting and auto-completion for both CPU and GPU code, and helps developers program more efficiently. It also has integrated code samples and online documentation to assist developers.

€œNvidia Nsight is the ultimate development platform for heterogeneous computing,€ Ian Buck, general manager of GPU computing software at Nvidia, said in a statement. €œWhether you€™re a graphics or HPC developer, Nsight makes it easy to develop parallel code for GPUs and CPUs using your preferred IDE.€

Meanwhile, for Windows-based developers, Nvidia also announced an updated version of Nvidia Nsight, Visual Studio Edition for Microsoft Windows developers. Nsight, Visual Studio Edition€”formerly known as NVIDIA Parallel Nsight€”adds a number of enhancements and updated features designed to make parallel programming on GPU-based Windows systems faster and easier.

Key among these features is local single GPU debugging, which enables CUDA developers to debug their CUDA C/C++ code natively on the hardware with any system equipped with any CUDA 1.1 or higher capable GPU. Other features include performance improvements to the frame profiler and debugger, and support for DirectX 9 frame debugging, frame profiling and analysis.

€œPreviously, debugging required dedicated systems that were often expensive and time consuming to configure,€ said Tony Tamasi, senior vice president of content and technology at Nvidia. €œNow, any system with an Nvidia GPU that supports debugging can be used without any additional cost or system upgrades, resulting in significant cost and time savings.€

Developers can sign up to receive a free preview of Nvidia Nsight, Eclipse Edition or Nsight, Visual Studio Edition by joining the Nvidia GPU Computing Registered Developer program by clicking here.

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