Government IT: Discovery's Final Flight, ISS and Beyond: NASA's Memorable 2010

 
 
By Nathan Eddy  |  Posted 2010-12-28
 
 
 

Discoverys Final Flight, ISS and Beyond: NASAs Memorable 2010

by Nathan Eddy

Discoverys Final Flight, ISS and Beyond: NASAs Memorable 2010

Space Shuttle Discovery Grounded

During the 11-day STS-133 mission, Discovery will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, on its 39th and final mission.

Space Shuttle Discovery Grounded

New Directions

In February, NASA awarded $50 million in Space Act Agreements: The contracts are for the development of crew concepts and technology demonstrations for future commercial support of human spaceflight.

New Directions

Back to the Moon

New soil data about the moon uncovered by a NASA satellite determined the presence water in the form of mostly pure ice crystals.

Back to the Moon

Sun Spotting

Photos from the Solar Dynamics Observatory showed extreme close-ups of activity on the sun's surface.

Sun Spotting

Coming Close

The EPOXI mission spacecraft successfully flew past comet Hartley 2 in November, providing information about the comet's volume and material spewing from its surface.

Coming Close

Obama in Orlando

President Obama sought to reassure the space agency it would not be neglected, promising to increase NASA's budget by $6 billion.

Obama in Orlando

Arsenic and Old Space

NASA-funded researchers conducting tests in Mono Lake in California discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic.

Arsenic and Old Space

Going Deep

NASA responded in August to a request from the Chilean government for technical advice to assist with the rescue of 33 trapped miners in a copper and gold mine.

Going Deep

Staying Afloat

The second decade of a new era in human history—when not everyone lives on our home planet—began Nov. 2, 2010, as the ISS crossed the 1.5 billion-mile mark of its travels with six residents on board and six visitors en route.

Staying Afloat

Tracking Oil on Water

Advanced remote-sensing instruments on NASA Earth-observing satellites and aircraft provided data on the Gulf oil spill's location, oil concentrations and impact on ecosystems in the Gulf.

Tracking Oil on Water

Rocket Fuel