Linux, Open Source & Ubuntu: Cloud Computing, Security, Big Data: 10 Enterprise Linux Adoption Drivers

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-01-23
 
 
 

Big Data

More than 75 percent of respondents to a Linux Foundation survey said they have concerns about their organizations ability to handle the ongoing explosion of big data. Solving the problem involves more than simply adding more storage; organizations need to invest in better overall management and care of their data.

Big Data

Cloud Computing

More than 61 percent of organizations cited cloud-based applications, whether public, private or hybrid. Of those users in the cloud, 66 percent are using Linux as their primary platform, up 4.7 percent from last year. Going forward, 34.9 percent of organizations are planning to migrate more applications to the cloud, an increase from 26 percent last year.

Cloud Computing

Virtualization

The decade-long growth of virtualization on x86 platforms is also clearly reflected in the annual Linux Foundation survey, with 72 percent of organizations expecting to have 25 percent or more of their servers virtualized by years end. More than 46 percent of organizations expect to have 50 percent or more of their platforms virtualized by the end of 2012, an 18 percent increase over last year.

Virtualization

Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)

70 percent of respondents listed TCO as a key driver for the adoption of Linux in their enterprise environment.

Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)

Features

In the survey, 68.6 percent of respondents said the features and technical superiority of Linux is a key driver to adoption of the operating system in their enterprise environment.

Features

Security

The survey also found that 63.6 percent of respondents cited Linux security as a key reason for adoption of these operating systems in the enterprise.

Security

Talent

The report showed that 52.7 percent of respondents to the Linux Foundation survey cited the availability of in-house talent with Linux experience as a key driver for Linux adoption in the enterprise.

Talent

No Vendor Lock-in

The Linux Foundation survey found that 52.5 percent of respondents cited the lack of vendor lock-in as a key driver for the adoption of Linux in the enterprise.

No Vendor Lock-in

Openness

The report also found that 50.8 percent of respondents cited Linuxs openness and the ability to modify code as a key driver for the adoption of the operating system in the enterprise.

Openness

Long-term Viability

In addition, 47.5 percent of respondents to the Linux Foundation survey cited the potential long-term viability of the Linux platform as a key driver for the adoption of the operating system in the enterprise.

Long-term Viability

Choice of Software

The Linux Foundation survey found that 38.5 percent of respondents cited choice of software as a key driver for the adoption of the operating system in the enterprise.

Choice of Software

Hardware Choice

Finally, 37.1 percent of respondents to the Linux Foundation survey cited choice of hardware as a key driver for the adoption of the operating system in the enterprise.

Hardware Choice

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