Nokia N86 8-Megapixel Smartphone Coming to U.S.

 
 
By Michelle Maisto  |  Posted 2009-07-20
 
 
 

Nokia's flagship imaging device, the N86 8MP, will be arriving in the United States in "the coming weeks," Nokia announced July 17.

Featuring an 8-megapixel camera, Nokia touts the N86 as a true replacement for a point-and-shoot camera. It features a Carl Zeiss lens, dual LED flash and a 2.6-inch AMOLED (active-matrix organic light-emitting diode) screen.

(AMOLED is said to offer power savings as well as better image quality and a more rugged display than LCD options. In March, the Samsung Impression was the first AMOLED touch-screen to arrive in this country.)

Also notable is the N86's two-way sliding design. It slides vertically in both directions-slide the screen up to reveal a keypad, and slide it down to discover a control panel for video functions and more.

An accelerometer means the N86's screen can also be viewed in landscape mode, and a built-in "kickstand" allows the device to rest at an angle convenient for video watching.

A Share Online client comes preinstalled, for one-click uploads of video to social networking and other sites. And Ovi services, such as Ovi Maps, N-Gage and Ovi Files, also come preloaded.

Nokia is mum on many more details, but fan site NokiaN86.org is reporting that the N86 additionally features a shutter that operates at up to 1/1,000 second; video recording at a resolution of 640 by 480; 8GB of internal memory, plus a microSD slot for more; Bluetooth 2.0; Wi-Fi 802.11b/g connectivity; an internal compass; an FM radio; assisted GPS; and support for triband 3G HSDPA/HSUPA networks. It's also said to run Symbian's S60 3rd Edition.

The N86 will retail for $558 and be available through Nokia Flagship stores.

On July 15, AT&T introduced a point-and-shoot replacement phone, the Sony Ericsson C905a Cyber-shot. Packaged inside the 3G slider phone, it features an 8.1-megapixel camera with face detection, an Xenon flash with red-eye reduction, auto-focus, 16-times digital zoom and BestPic technology, which shoots multiple images with each shutter click.

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