Enterprise Mobility: Smartphones' Expanding Versatility: 10 Products They Can Replace

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2010-11-22
 
 
 

Smartphones Expanding Versatility: 10 Products They Can Replace

by Don Reisinger

Smartphones Expanding Versatility: 10 Products They Can Replace

Apple iPad

Apple's iPad is a fine product for those who want a tablet, but when it comes time to compare its functionality to a smartphone—especially the iPhone 4—there aren't many reasons why folks should opt for the iPad over Apple's smartphone. After all, the iPhone 4 includes the same operating system and boasts more features. Plus, the smartphone allows users to place calls, making it all the more useful. All that fails to mention that the iPad starts at $499, compared with the iPhone 4's $199 entry fee.

Apple iPad

Samsung Galaxy Tab

The Samsung Galaxy Tab is being touted as the tablet that can compete most effectively against the iPad. But in reality, it's a device that features Android 2.2, which Google itself has said is designed for smartphones, and it features a 7-inch display, which might make it a bit too small for tablets. It's a middle-of-the-road device that might offer less value for some consumers than the top smartphones on the market.

Samsung Galaxy Tab

Netbooks

Netbooks are designed to be mobile companions of folks when they're away from home. And for the most part, they're priced right. But as they continue to lose market share to tablets, it's also becoming clear that smartphones might be a better option. After all, smartphones have calling capabilities mixed in with the ability to perform basic tasks that can be achieved on a netbook. It's something that consumers are quickly starting to realize.

Netbooks

Boring Old Mobile Phones

Old-style mobile phones just don't cut it any longer. Consumers and enterprise customers need smartphones to deliver the kind of functionality that they really need. And the problem is, they won't find that until they ditch mobile phones and opt for smartphone alternatives. Mobile phones work well when voice communication is all that's required, but as the growth of smartphones has shown, that's not all that's required today.

Boring Old Mobile Phones

HPs iPaq

HP is still selling its iPaq line of pocket PCs. It's an interesting decision on the company's part, and it's one that it might need to reconsider. Smartphones reign supreme in the mobile market. That won't change anytime soon. The sooner HP ditches its iPaq and starts doubling down on the Palm Pre 2, the better its chances will be of staying relevant in the mobile market.

HPs iPaq

Apple MacBook Air

Apple's MacBook Air is a unique device. It's far more netbooklike than tabletlike, and it allows for the kind of mobility that consumers are looking for today. But it's not nearly as mobile as a smartphone. And it's wildly expensive at the starting price of $999. If netbooks are being replaced by smartphones, there's no reason why smartphones won't be preferred over the MacBook Air as well.

Apple MacBook Air

Lightweight Notebooks

Lightweight notebooks have been able to weather the netbook storm, and they're holding up against tablets. But as more and more people adopt smartphones, it might only be a matter of time before they decide that a lightweight notebook isn't for them either. Lightweight notebooks are fine when doing work, but people are finding that smartphones can also be handy, quick work companions. And the better option is to have a hefty laptop in tow, rather than a lightweight and typically underpowered notebook. The smartphone can pick up where the laptop leaves off.

Lightweight Notebooks

Old-School Tablets

Believe it or not, old-school Windows-based tablets are still available. Consumers can use a stylus to tap around a screen and get the Windows installation they might care about. But after using those products, customers will quickly realize that those tablets fall short. The smartphone is undoubtedly a more viable option than anything HP or Dell are offering with their own tablets.

Old-School Tablets

GPS Devices

GPS devices were once all the craze in the mobile market. But with the help of products such as the iPhone and Android-based devices, those products have been hit hard. In fact, consumers can use their iPhones or apps available in the App Store to find directions to just about anywhere. In the process, GPS devices are becoming far less viable.

GPS Devices

Simple Photography/Videography

Point-and-shoot digital cameras or lightweight camcorders might be favorites among some consumers, but with the help of highly capable smartphones, those devices aren't as important any longer. Devices such as the Motorola Droid X feature an outstanding ability to snap stills or take video. They're making simple cameras and camcorders somewhat obsolete.

Simple Photography/Videography

Rocket Fuel