Box.net Adds Text Search Function

 
 
By Nicholas Kolakowski  |  Posted 2009-03-25
 
 
 

Box.net, which provides online content storage and collaboration solutions, announced on March 24 a new full-text search function for its line of applications, allowing users to scour their networks via an integrated search bar for relevant documents and information. In doing so, the company adds its own contribution to enterprise search.

Enterprise search has been the subject of increased focus by many IT vendors, which have been developing applications to scour end users' sometimes-sprawling networks. However, despite the solutions on the market, many companies still express frustration over their ability to find information within their internal ecosystem.

"In an enterprise context, there's a lot of complexity around enterprise search," Jen Grant, vice president of marketing for Box.net, said in an interview. "Our customers already have their files on Box, so when you talk about search in that context, you're talking about an enterprise search solution.

"Collaboration space is a key focus for us," Grant added. "As in, moving away from just storage and really fleshing things out to make the collaboration workspace as useful as possible."

The search function is included in the business version of Box.net, which costs $15 per user per month.

On Feb. 4, Box.net took steps toward becoming a sturdier content management provider for the enterprise by adding profiles, discussion groups, bookmarks and other social computing features.

The startup is an IT solution for small to midsize businesses that aren't in the market for IBM Lotus Connections, IBM Lotus Quickr or Microsoft SharePoint.

Users on a Box.net system have profiles that store their e-mail address and other information; in addition, users can create bookmarks, see what projects other users are working on or start discussions over work-related issues. Box.net currently has more than 2 million users.

The online file and storage service space is seen as a viable competitive environment by a number of companies, including smaller entities such as DropBox, and larger concerns such as Google, which is currently rumored to be working on a Gdrive that will store a user's data entirely online.


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