Windows 8 'Metro' a Thing of the Past?

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-08-02
 
 
 

Microsoft is moving to stop using the term €œMetro€ to describe the definitive applications that run on its Windows 8 operating system, according to a report.

When Microsoft initially introduced Windows 8 last year at its BUILD conference in September, the company described Metro-style apps as being key to the touch-first user interface of the new platform.

Microsoft said of Metro style: €œWindows 8 introduces a new Metro style interface built for touch, which shows information important to you, embodies simplicity and gives you control. The Metro style UI is equally at home with a mouse and keyboard as well.€

However, now, the functionality and intent of what goes into a Metro style app has not changed, only Microsoft€™s use of the term has, according to a report in the All About Microsoft blog.

Yet, Microsoft would not say whether it was a copyright or trademark issue or some other legal matter.

Microsoft has said Windows 8 will be powered by apps. €œWindows 8 introduces a new Metro style interface built for touch, which shows information important to you, embodies simplicity and gives you control,€ the company said in a press release. €œThe Metro style UI is equally at home with a mouse and keyboard as well.€

Moreover, at BUILD, Microsoft€™s Windows president Steven Sinofsky, in discussing the finer points of Windows 8, said: €œAnd then we're going to show you how to build these incredibly cool what we call Metro style applications. They're full screened, they're immersive, they're touch-centric, and we're going to show you how to build those from the ground up using world class development tools.€

So the Metro style apps are central to Windows 8. But if they will no longer be called €œMetro€ what in the world will Microsoft call them?

In a response to a query on the issue of the use of the term €œMetro,€ Microsoft told All About Microsoft:

€œWe have used  Metro style as a code name during the product development cycle across many of our product lines. As we get closer to launch and transition from industry dialog to a broad consumer dialog we will use our commercial names.€

 

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