Atigeo Launches Applications for Health Care Record Coding, Research

 
 
By Brian T. Horowitz  |  Posted 2012-10-02
 
 
 

Atigeo, a cloud software provider for health care, has launched applications for health record coders and personal medical research based on its xPatterns big data platform.

The company is demonstrating both xPatterns C.A.C. (Computer Assisted Coding) and MedConnect at the American Health Information Management Association 2012 conference from Oct. 1 to 3 in Chicago.

On Sept. 28, Atigeo commercially launched xPatterns C.A.C., for hospitals, doctors' offices and payers.

In beta for the past year, xPatterns C.A.C. automatically generates clinical codes from in-patient or outpatient hospital visits, or patient exams in a doctor's office, and allows providers to simplify code validation.

"We've tooled the platform so it operates in whichever one of those [environments] the customer needs to operate within," Christopher Burgess, chief operating officer and chief security officer for Atigeo, told eWEEK.

It allows organizations to improve the accuracy of billing, said Michael Sandoval, Atigeo's chairman and CEO.

Working with xPatterns C.A.C. enables users to see International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 and ICD-10 claims code data side by side.

The health care industry is required to adopt ICD-10 by 2014. On Aug. 24, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the extension of the deadline to 2014 to begin using the ICD-10 codes.

This visibility of both ICD-9 and ICD-10 should lead to better patient outcomes and revenue, according to Atigeo. The codes are also supposed to speed up provider-payer turnaround, enable automatic traceability of which coder entered the record and allow doctors to spend more time with patients, the company reported.

The application's analytical dashboards allow health care organizations to view clinical outcomes, doctors' workloads and analytics for population health management.

In addition, xPatterns C.A.C. helps solve health care obstacles of fraud and waste, Atigeo reported. The application's audit mode allows doctors and hospital administrators to fix undercoding, overcoding and miscoding.

"It provides for traceability with the coders," said Sandoval, who noted that health insurers use the software for payer audits.

Furthermore, xPatterns C.A.C. can search through patients' electronic health records (EHRs) to make automatic code recommendations.

The software supports coding consistency, said Burgess.

"When they make a correction over something the tool coded, that is immediately learned so the next time around if they or another coder in their group has a similar set of diagnostics or other verbiage inside an encounter note, it will be coded in the correct manner that was identified by that coder," said Burgess.

On July 24, Atigeo launched another application on xPatterns called PubMed Explorer, which pulls data from the National Institute of Health's PubMed database to generate search results for medical data based on context.

Meanwhile, on Oct. 1 Atigeo introduced MedConnect, an application available for Apple iOS that uses the company's xPatterns big data platform to analyze data in research papers and clinical trials. "The xPatterns MedConnect application puts the power of medical research into the hands of patients," said Sandoval.

MedConnect allows patients to search for medical information specific to them, he said.

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