Mobile Phone-Related Fatal Car Crashes Highest in Tennessee

 
 
By Nathan Eddy  |  Posted 2013-05-09
 
 
 

Mobile Phone-Related Fatal Car Crashes Highest in Tennessee

by Nathan Eddy

Mobile Phone-Related Fatal Car Crashes Highest in Tennessee

Tennessee Leads in Reported Mobile-Related Fatalities

Tennessee reported the highest number of fatal crashes involving cell phones, at 93.

Tennessee Leads in Reported Mobile-Related Fatalities

Texas Is Second-Highest, but Louisiana Reports None

Texas reported 38 mobile phone-incurred fatal accidents, but in a sign that reporting is uneven, its neighbor state Louisiana reported none.

Texas Is Second-Highest, but Louisiana Reports None

California, With Miles of Highways, Posts Just 22

The nation's most populous states recorded just 22 of these fatal accidents in 2011.

California, With Miles of Highways, Posts Just 22

Florida Ranks Fourth With 21 Fatalities

Say what you want about elderly drivers, but the retirement capital of the United States only recorded 21 mobile phone-related driving fatalities.

Florida Ranks Fourth With 21 Fatalities

Illinois Rounds Out the Top Five

The numbers fall off sharply once we move to Illinois, where the state recorded just 14 fatalities in 2011, although as was mentioned, faulty reporting may have had much to do with that.

Illinois Rounds Out the Top Five

Here's How the Map Plays Out

This infographic gives us an incomplete picture as to where mobile phone-related fatalities occur, thanks to a fragmented reporting process.

Here's How the Map Plays Out

Where Is Data Lost in the Process?

The report found that, when cell phone factors are missing from national data, most often it was not included in original police crash reports. (Photo credit: La Cara Salma)

Where Is Data Lost in the Process?

Unknowns Complicate the Count

It may not be possible to ever know how many crashes involve drivers using cell phones, the report indicated.

Unknowns Complicate the Count

Where the Data is Stored

State agencies compile, code, audit and validate data. Paper forms are manually coded into electronic systems, and crash data from multiple-source documents are recorded for national uniformity.

Where the Data is Stored

Why Don't We Have a Complete Picture?

Drivers may be reluctant to tell the truth or they are seriously injured or deceased. Also, witnesses' memories and statements may be inaccurate, and there are no definitive ways to confirm that use of a mobile phone was the cause of the accident.

Why Don't We Have a Complete Picture?

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