eWEEK Labs in Review: Greetings to the Google Phone

This was the week that T-Mobile and Google lifted the reviews NDA on the long-awaited Google Phone--now called the T-Mobile G1 with Google--and Andrew had almost as much to say about the new device as he did about his iPhone activation troubles back in 2007. For your Google Phone-gawking pleasure,

This was the week that T-Mobile and Google lifted the reviews NDA on the long-awaited Google Phone--now called the T-Mobile G1 with Google--and Andrew had almost as much to say about the new device as he did about his iPhone activation troubles back in 2007.

For your Google Phone-gawking pleasure, Andrew served up:

* A Product Review -- T-Mobile Android Smart Phone a Solid Device
* A Slide Show (in our spiffy new viewer) -- T-Mobile G1 with Google (Android Phone)
* An Android App Store Analysis -- Test-Driving the Android Market
* A T-Mobile-Network-Under-Siege Analysis -- T-Mobile's 3G Day of Reckoning
* A Just-How-Flimsy-Is-This-Thing Investigation -- G1 Morning After Problems and Regrets

If that's not enough Andrew for you, go have a peek at his idle thoughts over at Twitter.

For my part, I opined this week on the battle between open and closed licensing in the emerging cloud, and took a look at what's cooking on the security front from what I consider to be the three most watch-worthy community Linux distributions, Ubuntu, Fedora and OpenSUSE. There's also a slide show on the trio, for your viewing pleasure.

Meanwhile, Jim Rapoza is figuring out how to rearrange his schedule to make way for the 20 hours per month he'll need to read the privacy polices of the Web sites he visits.

Cameron Sturdevant took an hour-long break this week from his preparations for an upcoming Green IT feature to impart some wisdom around "Enhancing Data Center Performance" to a group of eSeminar participants (a recording of the event is available for viewing at your convenience).

Jeff Cogswell offered up some expert analysis of Amazon.com's cloud computing services, and what these services mean for developers.

On the Channel front, Frank Ohlhorst took a look this week at what SonicWall's NSA 240 Unified Threat Management appliance means for the small and midsize business market, and examined the challenge that unified communications software vendor Unison Technologies poses to Microsoft and its Office Communications Server.

Frank also weighed in on Ericom Software's PowerTerm WebConnect desktop virtualization product.

If you have a burning IT question that only eWEEK Labs can answer, drop me or another Labs analyst a line, or have your say in the comments section below. Have a great weekend, everyone.