Making Video Conversion Simple

 
 
Jim Rapoza, Chief Technology Analyst, eWEEK.For nearly fifteen years, Jim Rapoza has evaluated products and technologies in almost every technology category for eWEEK. Mr Rapoza's current technology focus is on all categories of emerging information technology though he continues to focus on core technology areas that include: content management systems, portal applications, Web publishing tools and security. Mr. Rapoza has coordinated several evaluations at enterprise organizations, including USA Today and The Prudential, to measure the capability of products and services under real-world conditions and against real-world criteria. Jim Rapoza's award-winning weekly column, Tech Directions, delves into all areas of technologies and the challenges of managing and deploying technology today.
By Jim Rapoza  |  Posted 2007-02-16 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Probably like a lot of people nowadays my digital camera has become more than just a tool for still photos. I've found that the quality of the video that my camera takes is actually now pretty good, certainly good enough for active videos from vacations, parties and other social events. But like a lot of digital cameras, the format that my camera saves its video files in is the Quicktime mov format. This would be fine if I just wanted to watch video on computer screens. But I want to put the video onto DVDs and share them with family and friends, who can take the DVDs and play them on their standard DVD players. Even better, I'd like to be able to convert these videos into a format so that they could be viewed on video iPods and other handheld video devices. But while mov is a nice video format, it is probably the hardest to convert into other formats and very few DVD players can play this format natively.

And while there are plenty of tools available for converting pretty much any video format into any other video format, mov is probably the most problematic, with tools for conversion often hard to find and difficult to use. However, I recently got the chance to test out an application that makes it pretty simple to convert mov (and most other video files) into any format that I need. View screen of Movavi VideoSuite As the name implies, Movavi VideoSuite 4 has the ability to convert mov files into avi files. But it can also convert them into native DVD formats, MPEG, DivX, whatever you need. Using Movavi I was able to easily open and convert video files, burn DVDs and convert files into formats for viewing on video iPods and other handheld video players. The Windows-based Movavi also includes basic video editing capabilities and can also convert and manage audio files. Of course, anyone who is familiar with the Web site www.videohelp.com knows that there are plenty of free or near free tools out there that can handle a wide variety of video conversion and editing tools. But in many cases these tools aren't the easiest in the world to use. For those users who want to convert their video files but don't want to spend the time learning proper frame rates or video codecs, Movavi VideoSuite 4 is just about the easiest tool I've seen for handling these tasks, which for these users may make it worth the $59.99 price tag. An eval version of Movavi VideoSuite 4 can be downloaded at www.movavi.com

 
 
 
 
del.icio.us | digg.com
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...

 
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel