Using and Installing Yahoo! OneSearch Voice

As promised, here are some screen shots of Yahoo! OneSearch Voice in action on an AT&T Blackberry Pearl 8120. Install was pretty simple. Went to http://m.yahoo.com/voice, clicked yes to a couple things and the install went ahead. One troubling note was this disclaimer on the install page that deserves more investigation later on: "For devices that support WiFi, please make sure to turn off the WiFi option before starting the application." I chose not to change permissions on the device at install time, so I was instead forced to approve the changes the first time I ran OneSearch. I learned quickly that I had to hold down the Call button while speaking. Once I discovered that little detail, I was able to speak into the phone to find the status of a flight (that I am not going to be on) or look for a Sushi restaurant in town (I actually ate at the first restaurant listed last night - the Unagi was spectacular.) What is startling about OneSearch Voice was how quickly I was able to get going with the application. Having spent a lot of time with Dragon voice recognition software recently, I was expected there would be some period of training to accustom the software to my voice. But there was none at all. The first two questions I asked it (while holding the button down, of course), I got exactly the results I was looking for. OneSearch Voice is available now for Blackberry devices, and Yahoo! expects to have the software available via operators on new devices sometime this summer.

As promised, here are some screen shots of Yahoo OneSearch Voice in action on an AT&T Blackberry Pearl 8120. onesearchinstall.JPG

The installation was pretty simple. I went to http://m.yahoo.com/voice, clicked yes to a couple things and the install went ahead.

One troubling note was a disclaimer on the install page that deserves more investigation later on: "For devices that support WiFi, please make sure to turn off the WiFi option before starting the application." onsearch1sttime.JPG

I chose not to change permissions on the device at install time, so I was instead forced to approve the changes the first time I ran OneSearch. onesearchsearch.JPG

I learned quickly that I had to hold down the Call button while speaking. Once I discovered that little detail, I was able to speak into the phone to find the status of a flight (that I am not going to be on) or look for a sushi restaurant in town. (I actually ate at the first restaurant listed last night--the Unagi was spectacular.)

What is startling about OneSearch Voice is how quickly I was able to get going with the application. Having spent a lot of time with Dragon voice recognition software recently, I expected there would be some period of training to get the software accustomed to my voice. But there was none at all. The first two questions I asked it (while holding the button down, of course), yielded exactly the results I was looking for.

OneSearch Voice is available now for BlackBerry devices, and Yahoo expects to have the software available via operators on new devices sometime this summer.