App Is a Bit Heavy-Handed

InfoExpress' CyberGatekeeper uses "all stick and no carrot" to keep remote users in line when it comes to security and anti-virus products.

InfoExpress CyberGatekeeper uses "all stick and no carrot" to keep remote users in line when it comes to security and anti-virus products. During tests, I used the product to prevent log-ins by remote users who had either removed or had not upgraded various InfoExpress and third-party security products.

Although some harshness is necessary to keep users in line, IT managers should think twice before rolling out the pricey $59-per-seat CyberGatekeeper agent: The product offers no wiggle room for end users to get access to corporate assets, thereby forcing them to make a call to the help desk.

For example, I mandated that the latest version of my anti-virus software be present before a user could gain access to the corporate net.

Machines that had anti-virus software, but not the latest version, were not allowed to log in. The catch is that I was using the network to distribute the anti-virus update. Although the idea behind CyberGatekeeper (released last month) is good, only the most thoroughly coordinated IT shops should consider using this product.