How to Determine Your Company's Cyber-Exposure Profile

How to Determine Your Company's Cyber-Exposure Profile
Business Analysis
Social Media Analysis
Data Leakage Analysis
Domain Analysis
Network Services Discovery
Vulnerability Assessment
Social Engineering Assessment
Threat Intelligence Review
Attack Assessment
Understand Your Cyber-Exposure Profile
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How to Determine Your Company's Cyber-Exposure Profile

By Chris Preimesberger

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Business Analysis

Building a cyber-exposure profile should include Internet searches for vital company information that has become public, such as financial statements; documents that should be under a nondisclosure agreement (NDA); and information that can be used in social engineering.

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Social Media Analysis

Companies should perform bulk analysis of social media platforms to discover oversharing or unauthorized disclosure of sensitive or exploitable information, or actual threats from internal or external sources.

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Data Leakage Analysis

Scan and analyze file sharing services for unauthorized copies of software, software keys, employee records and security credentials. Do security team members participate in forums and pose questions to security problems, or share how they have solved certain problems?

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Domain Analysis

Do similar domains and spoofed sites exist that could trick your customers or employees? Security teams must sort through various domains, using accurate URLs as well as common misspellings and typical replacement characters, such as using the numeral 1 in place of the letter L or 5 for the letter S. This type of intelligence is important for identifying potential social engineering attacks and spoofing attacks aimed at an enterprise's customers.

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Network Services Discovery

Organizations should scan to identify each of the active IP addresses and service components that are connected to the Internet and publicly accessible.

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Vulnerability Assessment

This portion of the process should include a thorough scan that searches known bugs, open-source vulnerabilities and malware. It should also identify any cloud-based files, scanning for the same. While this scan is something that many organizations do on a regular basis and is by no means an all-around security solution, it is an important step in building a complete cyber-exposure profile. BAE Systems Applied Intelligence, Kroll Ontrack, Mandiant, FireEye and Nettitude are among key suppliers of this service.

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Social Engineering Assessment

Determine if users are too susceptible to common social engineering techniques that would allow an attacker to compromise a user's system and gain access to the internal network.

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Threat Intelligence Review

A company can use cyber-threat intelligence to identify likely threats against its industry/sector/region and even threats against the company itself. Has the company already caught the attention of attackers? Once this question is answered, all of the information found can produce a prioritized threat assessment.

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Attack Assessment

Based on all of the information gathered, companies should think like an adversary and look at all of the potential vulnerabilities using a holistic view to identify how, given this information, cyber-criminals are most likely to gain access to their network.

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Understand Your Cyber-Exposure Profile

Without visibility into what cyber-criminals can learn from your cyber presence, you can't effectively protect against the threats posed to your organization. Conducting a thorough cyber-exposure profile will enable you to understand your cyber-exposure through the eyes of a would-be attacker and examine your security strategy through a different lens.

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