Marcher Trojan Hits Android Users Through Face Adobe Flash Installer

Today's topics include a warning that the Marcher Trojan is using a new tactic to infect Android users, reports that the Windows 10 Mobile Insider update breaks WEP, Microsoft's effort to bring Skype Meeting into more rooms and why developers are worried that AI may take their jobs.

Security firm Zscaler is warning about a new variant of the Android Marcher Trojan that is using Adobe Flash and adult content sites as a way to trick users into becoming infected and giving up financial information.

Many different vulnerabilities show up in Adobe Flash—in fact, Adobe just released fixes to address 23 of the latest security flaws this week. But the new Android Marcher Trojan isn't using an authentic version of Flash or exploiting vulnerabilities that Adobe has already patched. Rather, the Android Marcher Trojan uses a fake version of an Adobe Flash Player installer to infect users.

A new build of Windows 10 Mobile is now available for members of the Windows Insider early access program who are the first in line to test upcoming updates to the mobile operating system.

Although it includes several enhancements, users who are still connecting to virtually unprotected WEP WiFi networks may face some challenges. WEP has been largely supplanted by WiFi Protected Access (WPA) standards since the former was proven to be trivially easy to circumvent.

Early access users of the Windows 10 Mobile will likely have problems connected to WiFi routers that still use the WEP standard. Microsoft recommends configuring wireless routers to use WPA or WPA 2 or otherwise wait for an upcoming Insider build that restores WEP-based connectivity.

Microsoft wants to expand the reach of its video conferencing technology, and it's teaming up with longtime partner Polycom and Logitech to make it happen.

At the Enterprise Connect 2016 show this week, Microsoft officials announced a couple of initiatives designed to bring the software vendor's Skype Meeting technology to the 97 percent of meeting rooms in the world that are not equipped for modern video conferencing.

Software developers are just as concerned as workers in other fields that automation and technological advances could, at some point, endanger their jobs, according to a recent Evans Data survey.

The Evans Data study indicates that developers fear that their own obsolescence will be spurred by artificial intelligence. The company surveyed more than 550 developers across a variety of industries and found that nearly one-third believed that they were being replaced by technology.

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