Security Landscape in 2014: 11 Predictions From the Experts

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2013-12-05 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    1 - Security Landscape in 2014: 11 Predictions From the Experts
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    Security Landscape in 2014: 11 Predictions From the Experts

    by Chris Preimesberger
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    2 - Wearable Tech Will Slowly Gain Adoption
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    Wearable Tech Will Slowly Gain Adoption

    Wearable tech will be more of a novelty next year, but the biggest risk to be aware of is Near-Field Communication (NFC) hacking, or threats within a small proximity. As wearable tech gear communicates with other nearby gadgets, more hacks can be targeted to those nearby —Grayson Milbourne
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    3 - Developers Get More Concerned About App Security
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    Developers Get More Concerned About App Security

    Developers are becoming more aware of secure app development practices and risky app behaviors to avoid. That said, some app developers will continue to seek new ways to generate revenue from building apps that may intrude on privacy. —Grayson Milbourne
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    4 - For Targeted Attacks, Size Doesn't Matter
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    For Targeted Attacks, Size Doesn't Matter

    Whether you're a Fortune 500 company or a small business, cyber-criminals will continue to pursue targeted attacks, from advanced persistent threats (APTs) to spear-phishing. Cyber-criminals will continue to invent new ways to gain access to important files. —Grayson Milbourne
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    5 - Biometrics Alternatives Coming Next Year
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    Biometrics Alternatives Coming Next Year

    Apple's fingerprint scanner is just the beginning for biometrics alternatives coming next year. From eye-color scanners to heartbeat rate monitor sensors, we'll see mobile devices leveraging new methods to authenticate users. —Grayson Milbourne
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    6 - 80 Percent of Time Will Be Spent Using Mobile Apps
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    80 Percent of Time Will Be Spent Using Mobile Apps

    According to app analytics firm Flurry, we spend the majority of our time on mobile devices using our apps, but app security is not up to par. In 2014, hackers will continue to target apps—the most vulnerable point on a mobile device—as a new conduit to mobile infections. —Grayson Milbourne
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    7 - Credit Card Companies Will Market Security Services
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    Credit Card Companies Will Market Security Services

    Major credit card companies are already working to update their security standards for businesses accepting their credit cards. VISA, Mastercard and other major card brands have issued new requirements starting Jan. 1, 2014, to protect customers against cyber-attacks. Banks and credit card companies will market their security services instead of savings (i.e., low APR rates) or other perks. Financial institutions have the most to lose, so they'll have big plans to educate users on security practices. —Grayson Milbourne
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    8 - Organizations Will Own All Their Data
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    Organizations Will Own All Their Data

    In 2014, business will be increasingly conducted over untrusted networks and devices, and mounting pressure to embrace the cloud and mobility will compound the risk. Organizations will take ownership of their information by turning to data-level security that is agnostic to device, application, network, cloud provider or storage provider. Companies will look for outward-facing solutions that protect data at the point of origination, keeping it secure as it moves away from the center of the organization. This will enable companies to securely share data with customers and partners via ad hoc relationships beyond the organization's domain. —Jim Ivers
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    9 - Collaborative Economy Will Grow
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    Collaborative Economy Will Grow

    There is a steady rise of the collaborative economy and lots of new apps that store your credit information, and make buying services or products easier than ever. Given the balkanization of online payment systems, how do you protect yourself? In the New Year, paying via mobile for everything from catching a cab to ordering lunch will be increasingly common. It's easy and convenient, but there still aren't enough security protocols in place. The best way to protect yourself is to be wary about which apps you give your credit card, and never give a debit card to a mobile app. Once you do this, keep an eye on your statements; your bank can protect you from fraud, but only if you catch it first. —Charles McColgan
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    10 - 2014: Broader Adoption of Google Glass
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    2014: Broader Adoption of Google Glass

    Next year, we'll see broader adoption of Google Glass and smartwatches from employees. Google is preparing for wider adoption and a more user-friendly approach, so what does this mean for companies allowing Google Glass users to bring their devices to work? Critical information is at risk because hackers will use the loopholes in these devices for targeted attacks. —Charles McColgan
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    11 - Connected Homes Introduce a Creepy New Lifestyle
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    Connected Homes Introduce a Creepy New Lifestyle

    The connected home introduces a new "creepy factor." Modern tech has introduced Internet-connected front door locks and video surveillance in the home, meaning targeted attacks could result in scary scenarios in which attackers remotely breach home security systems. —Charles McColgan
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    12 - Cloud Storage Risk Will Grow
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    Cloud Storage Risk Will Grow

    While enterprises plan to move more data to the cloud, they need to be aware of employees accessing those files. Consumers will continue to use free cloud tools because they are easy to access and cost nothing. —Charles McColgan  
 

Like networking, security is one of the IT components that affects every part of an IT system, ranging from a sensor or automated machine or a human user of a device to the heart of a huge enterprise data center. Everybody who uses IT of any type has to be aware of and plan for security, especially in the hyper-connected world we share. We've come a long way from the early days of the Internet, in which most people used short, simple and easy-to-remember passwords to log in to online services, to present day, in which double- and triple-factor authentication and end-to-end encryption is common. Trends in security for 2014 include more wearable computers, an increase in Near-Field Communication (NFC) opportunities and more connected homes—which, as one of our sources claims, will bring a new measure of "creepiness" into our lives. This eWEEK slide show features perspectives from Grayson Milbourne, Webroot director of security intelligence; Jim Ivers, chief security strategist at Covata; and TeleSign CTO Charles McColgan. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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