Microsoft and AppFog Bring Multilanguage PaaS Goodness to Windows Azure

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-06-06 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

AppFog announced a partnership with Microsoft to give developers multilanguage platform as a service support on the Windows Azure cloud platform.

AppFog, provider of a platform as a service (PaaS) for developers who use multiple cloud platforms, has announced they have cooperated on the development of technology to provide interoperability between AppFog and Windows Azure.

The partnership between AppFog and Microsoft, announced June 6, means that the next version of AppFog will provide developers with the full power of Windows Azure€™s PHP, Node.js and .NET support for both on-premise and public cloud technologies. AppFog has developed technology that enables developers to seamlessly migrate their applications between other cloud providers into the Azure platform with no code changes, eliminating the concern of vendor lock-in, the company said.

€œWe are excited about AppFog€™s solution on Windows Azure and look forward to working with them. We think their solution will be great for developers, and will help enhance Windows Azure€™s support for open source even further,€ said Scott Guthrie, corporate vice president of the Windows Azure App Platform at Microsoft. Guthrie will deliver a keynote on June 7 at a Meet Windows Azure event in San Francisco.

€œBringing together Microsoft, an industry driver and strong supporter of the developer community, with our thriving, up-and-coming cloud developer community bridges the gap between traditional and Web developers while offering more choices to all,€ said Lucas Carlson, founder and CEO of AppFog, in a statement. €œWe are excited to give .NET, PHP and Node.js developers access to the intuitive, reliable and powerful Windows Azure platform and look forward to seeing the innovative products and solutions that will spring from this collaboration.€

Indeed, Carlson told eWEEK he also is glad to see that €œMicrosoft has realized how important it is to have a platform as a service and infrastructure as a service that embraces more than just .NET and to reach out further to the open-source communities. They have chosen AppFog to pull that off and bring more open-source software onto the Azure platform. We have tens of thousands of developers now using AppFog.€

The joint efforts between the two companies will deliver the following customer benefits:

€¢ interoperability of cloud service providers through collaborative development of two leaders in cloud technology;

€¢ extended developer language and service support for AppFog and Windows Azure customers including support for Enterprise .NET, PHP and Node.js applications; and

€¢ a new, simple and flexible approach for open-source developers to try Windows Azure.

AppFog€™s Azure compatibility is available to thousands of developers in private beta today and will be rolled into public beta within 180 days.

Carlson said Microsoft selected AppFog as its partner in this effort €œbecause our PaaS experience resonates strongly with developers and with the open-source community. And we picked Microsoft because Azure€™s stack brings a lot of .NET and enterprise credibility.€

Moreover, for his part, Carlson warns folks not to count Microsoft out in the cloud space. €œI think Microsoft has been thought of as an underdog in cloud with Azure, but what Microsoft is doing I€™m very bullish on. They€™ve been an underdog and now they have the opportunity to reestablish what Azure is and broaden the appeal.

AppFog is the creator of  platform as a service products AppFog and PHP Fog. With robust multilanguage and multi-infrastructure support, AppFog is a modern and agnostic PaaS, while PHP Fog is a leading PHP PaaS on the market.


 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel