For HP, Symantec, Others, Breaking Up Can Be Hard to Do

1 - For HP, Symantec, Others, Breaking Up Can Be Hard to Do
2 - HP Finally Makes the Move
3 - Symantec Follows HP's Lead
4 - eBay and PayPal Will Separate in 2015
5 - IBM Leads the Way
6 - Juniper Gets Out of the Security Business
7 - HP Spinoff Makes a Split of Its Own
8 - Motorola Was an Early Mover
9 - Alcatel-Lucent's Shift Plan
10 - EMC Feeling the Pressure
11 - Attention Turns to Cisco
12 - Dell Continues to Expand
13 - For Oracle, It's Full Steam Ahead
14 - Lenovo Uses PCs as a Starting Point
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For HP, Symantec, Others, Breaking Up Can Be Hard to Do

by Jeffrey Burt

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HP Finally Makes the Move

Within 12 months, HP will become HP Inc., which will sell PCs and printers, and Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, an IT solutions vendor. CEO Meg Whitman said the restructuring efforts of the past few years made the company strong enough to split up.

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Symantec Follows HP's Lead

Company officials in the past reportedly had discussed separating the security and storage businesses, though past CEOs resisted. Michael Brown, who took over the position in September, supports it.

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eBay and PayPal Will Separate in 2015

The two companies have been together for 12 years, but that ends next year, something activist investor Carl Icahn had been pushing for months.

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IBM Leads the Way

Big Blue has been shedding low-margin businesses for years to focus on such growing markets as software, analytics and the cloud. IBM sold Lenovo its PC business in 2005; on Oct. 1, IBM closed a $2.1 billion deal selling its x86 server business to Lenovo.

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Juniper Gets Out of the Security Business

Juniper for months has been under pressure by investors to streamline the business and improve the bottom line. The networking company sold off its mobile security business to Siris Capital for $250 million, creating a new company, PulseSecure.

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HP Spinoff Makes a Split of Its Own

HP in 1999 shed its test and measurement business, creating Agilent. In September, Agilent announced it was spinning off its measurement subsidiary, Keysight Technologies.

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Motorola Was an Early Mover

Motorola in 2011 broke into two companies, Motorola Mobility—selling consumer products like smartphones—and Motorola Solutions on the commercial side. A year later, Google bought Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion. Now it's selling Motorola to Lenovo for $2.9 billion.

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Alcatel-Lucent's Shift Plan

The company last year unveiled its Shift Plan to get back onto financial footing, and part of that plan was selling assets to gain $1.3 billion. Most recently, Alcatel-Lucent sold 85 percent of its enterprise business to Chinese investment company China Huaxin.

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EMC Feeling the Pressure

Investor Elliott Management, which also is involved in Juniper's situation, is pushing EMC to sell off all or part of its 85 percent stake in VMware. CEO Joe Tucci has said he is reluctant to sell off such a "strategic asset."

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Attention Turns to Cisco

Almost immediately after HP made its announcement, analysts started asking whether Cisco should do the same. Cisco is extending its reach in the data center and branching into the cloud, software and Internet of things.

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Dell Continues to Expand

The now-private company has been aggressively building up its capabilities in networking, storage, software and security to become an enterprise IT solutions and services vendor.

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For Oracle, It's Full Steam Ahead

It's hard to imagine a more acquisitive tech vendor than Oracle, which is rapidly bolstering its reach in everything from data center hardware to the cloud.

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Lenovo Uses PCs as a Starting Point

The company used its purchase of IBM's PC business to become the world's top PC vendor. Now it's turning its attention to servers (with the latest IBM deal) and smartphones (with Motorola).

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