Adaptec Acquires RAID Storage Maker Aristos Logic

Storage infrastructure provider Adaptec is getting back into the ASIC production business with this $41 million acquisition. Aristos Logic makes multiprotocol RAID storage processor boards that are delivered in both software and silicon solutions. Its ASIC development team has produced a scalable architecture that can be used in multiple product families.

Storage infrastructure provider Adaptec is getting back into the ASIC production business. Adaptec announced Aug. 27 that it is acquiring privately held RAID board maker Aristos Logic for about $41 million in cash.
Aristos employs about 75 people and has been supplying a handful of the top 10 largest storage makers with application-specific integrated circuits since 2000.
Adaptec, which makes storage controllers that are bought by virtually all the major data storage vendors-including IBM, Hewlett-Packard, EMC and NetApp-had dropped the board-making part of its business several years ago for reasons of economy and hired Intel to make them. With that decision, complete control and coordination over that part of the business was lost.
With the acquisition of Aristos Logic, Adaptec importantly regains the control of the ebb and flow of its circuit boards.
Aristos Logic makes multiprotocol RAID storage processor boards that are delivered in both software and silicon solutions. Its ASIC development team has produced a scalable architecture that can be used in multiple product families, ranging from entry-level internal RAID storage to high-performance enterprise-class storage systems.
Aristos Logic's products are deployed in high-density applications that require a compact footprint.
"Aristos Logic's technologies and customers will also enable us to expand into high-growth adjacent RAID segments, including performance desktops, blade servers and enterprise-class external storage systems," S. "Sundi" Sundaresh, president and CEO of Adaptec, said in a news release.
"Aristos Logic will also provide us with a strong ASIC road map. Their next-generation 6GB-per-second serial RAID controllers will expand our channel offerings and enhance the value of our current lines of Unified Serial SATA and SAS products."

Chris Preimesberger

Chris Preimesberger

Chris Preimesberger is Editor of Features & Analysis at eWEEK, responsible in part for the publication's coverage areas. In his 10 years and more than 3,500 stories at eWEEK, he has distinguished...