Datical Brings DevOps to Database Deployment Monitoring

Datical DMC provides teams with visibility into the outcomes of all database deployments, detailing the scope of changes applied and identifying causes of failures, a process that can typically take days or weeks to complete.

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Database automation software maker Datical has added an important new DevOps-type function to its specialized platform for database administrators.

The company’s Deployment Monitoring Console, released June 27, is a new addition to the Datical DB platform that automatically monitors the status of every database deployment across an enterprise and reports back in real time to a central control dashboard.

Datical DMC provides teams with visibility into the outcomes of all database deployments, detailing the scope of changes applied and identifying causes of failures, a process that can typically take days or weeks to complete. All levels of the organization–from DBAs to application developers and QA to IT management–can audit the database, measure release velocity and monitor deployments.

This is unusual because in pre-DevOps days, only certified database admins would be allowed anywhere near a database, which often contains the enterprise's family jewels. But times obviously have changed–sometimes to the chagrin of old-school DBAs.

Right in Line with New-Gen Trends

Datical DMC is a product that travels directly in the lanes of current development trends: It’s all about speed, choices, automation and centralized control. This is what enables IT managers to make quick decisions; and even if a decision is mistaken, the software allows admins to go back and make fixes in near-real time if necessary.

“If you look at a list of our customers, and they represent a full spectrum of business—transportation, insurance, health care, media and entertainment—they all have one thing in common: They all recognize that at the end of the day, regardless of what industry or sector they’re in, they are all software companies,” Datical Vice-President of Marketing Ben Geller told eWEEK.

“In order to compete and win in the marketplace, they know they have to move fast. Applications are sort of the currency of competition—it’s all about making sure that you can get your next and latest set of apps into the hands of the people who need them really quickly to drive great experiences, whether for your employees or your customers. It’s this application innovation that’s going to help companies make money or save money.”

Datical DMC provides a single point of access to an organization’s database deployment activity. The data also can be presented or visualized in several ways for different role players in the enterprise. Datical DMC delivers relevant  information to all stakeholders on demand, whether they need to know what’s been deployed to a database, why a specific operation failed, or how quickly changes are moving through the release cycle, Geller said.

Lack of Visibility Has Always Been an Issue

“One of the primary obstacles to accelerating release velocity is the lack of visibility into database status. Determining what was changed in an environment or the root cause of application deployment errors related to the database is like trying to find a needle in a haystack,” said Pete Pickerill, co-founder and VP of product strategy at Datical. “With Datical Deployment Monitoring Console, customers are able to immediately discover the information they need without spending hours or days investigating or troubleshooting.”

The end result is faster-moving application development teams who spend less time in firefighting mode and more time innovating and building the next set of applications and features to ensure revenue growth and increased customer acquisition, Geller said.

The Austin, Texas-based Datical team has been building database and application deployments for more than a decade. For more information, go here.

Chris Preimesberger

Chris Preimesberger

Chris Preimesberger is Editor of Features & Analysis at eWEEK, responsible in large part for the publication's coverage areas. In his 12 years and more than 3,900 stories at eWEEK, he has...