Guidelines for How to Plan a Next-Gen Data Center

What factors and best practices should be considered in developing a data center strategy and architecture while balancing risk, cost, quality and agility? Gartner Research analysts Donna Scott and Paul McGuckin offer their perspectives at the Gartner Data Center Conference Dec. 2 at the MGM Grand Hotel.

LAS VEGAS-Few IT managers ever get the opportunity to put together a well-written, well-researched strategy with detailed architecture to build a fresh new data center.
What is most likely to happen in the real world is that a manager will inherit an older data center-one in which the inventory increases over time due to business initiatives, mergers and acquisitions, shadow IT, and business growth.
Then, depending upon budgetary allowances, the manager may occasionally start a project to rationalize the value of the data center-typically driven by a large fiscal-year savings he or she may have achieved after consolidating a bunch of servers, thanks to virtualization software.

Click here to read about where Gartner sees virtualization headed in the next five years.

This scenario was reported as a typical one in a survey taken at the November 2007 Gartner Data Center Conference, where nearly three-quarters of the attendees said they were in the process of a physical data center consolidation project. This is still pretty much status quo today.
At the Gartner Data Center Conference Dec. 2 at the MGM Grand Hotel, Gartner Research analysts Donna Scott and Paul McGuckin offered their perspectives on what factors and best practices should be considered in developing a data center strategy and architecture, while balancing risk, cost, quality and agility.

Chris Preimesberger

Chris J. Preimesberger

Chris J. Preimesberger is Editor of Features & Analysis at eWEEK, responsible in large part for the publication's coverage areas. In his 12 years and more than 3,900 stories at eWEEK, he...