Apple Fixes Numerous OS X, iOS Security Flaws Reported by Google

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2015-12-10 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DAILY VIDEO: Apple updates OS X and iOS with numerous security fixes; Apple reportedly suspends plans for an Internet TV service; IBM focused on three major languages: Java, Node.js and Swift; and there's more.

 
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Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Today's topics include the new security fixes in Apple’s OS X and iOS update, reports that Apple is suspending its plans for an Internet TV service, IBM's decision to focus on three major coding languages, and why five European nations are calling on Facebook to rein in cookies on the social network.

Yesterday, Apple released security updates for its desktop Mac OS X 10.11 and mobile iOS 9 operating systems. The patched security issues span all aspects of both operating systems, including networking, graphics and wireless operations.

Of particular note in both the Mac OS X 10.11.2 and mobile iOS 9.2 updates is the number of security vulnerabilities patched. These security issues were reported to Apple by Ian Beer, a security researcher with Google's Project Zero.

Apple is apparently suspending its efforts to start its own Internet-based television streaming service after the company ran into resistance when trying to negotiate licensing arrangements with media companies for their content.

According to a Dec. 8 story by Bloomberg, Apple will instead focus on selling TV programming content for the same media companies to customers through Apple's own App Store, rather than offer it through a new stand-alone streaming service.

As a software development organization, IBM said it is looking at three primary programming languages/development environments for enterprise use going forward: Java, Node.js and Swift.

Java is ubiquitous in the enterprise, and IBM has amassed a large cache of Java technology and talent over the years. IBM also has been active in the Node.js and JavaScript community. Node.js is a server-side JavaScript development environment.

Through its MobileFirst for iOS partnership with Apple, IBM has developed a keen interest in the Swift programming language that Apple recently open-sourced.

A Belgium court ruled in November that Facebook must stop setting cookies for visitors who do not have an active account on the social network.

On Dec. 3, Facebook complied with the Belgian court order, but warned that non-members would not receive a specific cookie—known as the "datr" cookie—and would be blocked from accessing content on the site.

On Dec. 4, privacy authorities in France, Germany, Netherlands and Spain joined the Belgian Privacy Commission in requesting that Facebook stop tracking citizens who were not members of the social network.

 
 
 

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