Apple Seeks Permanent Fix for iPhone 6 Battery Charge Indicator Bug

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2016-01-20 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DAILY VIDEO: Apple working on iPhone 6 battery charge indicator glitch; Unisys brings 'Stealth' enterprise security to AWS Cloud; IBM's Dynamic Pricing helps retailers navigate online price wars; and there's more.

 
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Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Today's topics include Apple's efforts to fix an iPhone 6 battery charge indicator glitch, Unisys is bringing Stealth micro-segmentation security system to the AWS cloud, how IBM's Dynamic Pricing is supposed to help retailers navigate online pricing wars, and Samsung has started mass production on the world's fastest DRAM.

Apple is working to repair an annoying glitch that prevents iPhone 6s and 6s Plus battery charge indicators from updating accurately when a user switches time zones.

The issue occurs when users move through time zones while traveling or when they change the time zones manually on their devices, according to Apple.

To provide at least a temporary fix for the problem, Apple is advising users to restart their iPhone and then go to Settings > General > Date & Time, to ensure that "Set Automatically" is turned on.

Unisys today announced it will provide enterprises with its Unisys Stealth micro-segmentation security system on the Amazon Web Services Cloud.

This will be available for customers to acquire and deploy from the AWS marketplace. Unisys Stealth will deliver advanced security to AWS customers, while providing Unisys clients with the ease of access and scale of the AWS Cloud.

Unisys said it optimized the Stealth offering to give AWS customers a fast and convenient way to protect vital information and applications against evolving cyber threats.

IBM recently announced Dynamic Pricing, a new cloud-based offering for online retailers. Highlighted this week at the National Retail Federation's Retail's BIG Show, IBM Dynamic Pricing automatically recommends an online retailer's best response to changes in performance data and market conditions as well as the latest competitor pricing information.

The Dynamic Pricing enables retailers to intelligently adjust prices while driving customer loyalty and product demand.

On Jan. 19, Samsung announced that it has opened the throttle on mass producing the data storage industry's first 4-gigabyte DRAM (dynamic random access memory) package.

The memory processor is based on the second-generation High Bandwidth Memory (HBM2) interface, designed for use in high-performance computing, advanced graphics and network systems, as well as enterprise servers.

Seoul-based Samsung says its new HBM interface will bring more than seven times' faster performance than current DRAM.

 
 
 

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