Apple Seeks Permanent Fix for iPhone 6 Battery Charge Indicator Bug

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2016-01-20 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DAILY VIDEO: Apple working on iPhone 6 battery charge indicator glitch; Unisys brings 'Stealth' enterprise security to AWS Cloud; IBM's Dynamic Pricing helps retailers navigate online price wars; and there's more.

 
Apple Planning Larger iPhone 7, Market Chatter Suggests

DAILY VIDEO: Latest iPhone 7 rumor suggests a new, larger model is possible; Samsung confirms fix for...

French Regulators Says Microsoft Collects Too Much User Data

DAILY VIDEO: French regulators accuse Microsoft of improper data use; Samsung denies Galaxy S7 Active...

Oracle Distributes Largest-Ever List of Software Security Patches

DAILY VIDEO: Oracle issues its largest patch update ever; Why BlackBerry CEO Chen doesn't worry about...

Government Requests for Google User Data Continue to Rise

DAILY VIDEO: Google sees government requests for user data growing; Google tries to charm European...

Softbank to Acquire Chip Designer ARM in $32.2 Billion All-Cash Deal

DAILY VIDEO: Softbank deal to buy ARM aimed at bolstering its IoT reach; the hacking of Ubuntu Linux...

Microsoft Releases Azure SQL Data Warehouse for the Cloud

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft's Azure SQL data warehouse opens its doors to big data; IBM delivers secure...

Court Overturns Ruling Ordering Microsoft to Give DOJ Access to Email

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft wins appeal in Ireland email case; EU lobs new set of antitrust charges at...

Microsoft Power BI Embedded Now Fully Available

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft makes Power BI Embedded generally available; IBM joins Microsoft's Surface...

Samsung Galaxy Active S7 Fails Consumer Reports Water-Resistance Tests

DAILY VIDEO: Samsung Galaxy S7 Active smartphone flunks water tests; Salesforce testing Shield...

HPE Weighs Selling Software Assets: Report

DAILY VIDEO: HPE is reportedly considering selling software units; Qualcomm adds to its mobile chip...



Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Today's topics include Apple's efforts to fix an iPhone 6 battery charge indicator glitch, Unisys is bringing Stealth micro-segmentation security system to the AWS cloud, how IBM's Dynamic Pricing is supposed to help retailers navigate online pricing wars, and Samsung has started mass production on the world's fastest DRAM.

Apple is working to repair an annoying glitch that prevents iPhone 6s and 6s Plus battery charge indicators from updating accurately when a user switches time zones.

The issue occurs when users move through time zones while traveling or when they change the time zones manually on their devices, according to Apple.

To provide at least a temporary fix for the problem, Apple is advising users to restart their iPhone and then go to Settings > General > Date & Time, to ensure that "Set Automatically" is turned on.

Unisys today announced it will provide enterprises with its Unisys Stealth micro-segmentation security system on the Amazon Web Services Cloud.

This will be available for customers to acquire and deploy from the AWS marketplace. Unisys Stealth will deliver advanced security to AWS customers, while providing Unisys clients with the ease of access and scale of the AWS Cloud.

Unisys said it optimized the Stealth offering to give AWS customers a fast and convenient way to protect vital information and applications against evolving cyber threats.

IBM recently announced Dynamic Pricing, a new cloud-based offering for online retailers. Highlighted this week at the National Retail Federation's Retail's BIG Show, IBM Dynamic Pricing automatically recommends an online retailer's best response to changes in performance data and market conditions as well as the latest competitor pricing information.

The Dynamic Pricing enables retailers to intelligently adjust prices while driving customer loyalty and product demand.

On Jan. 19, Samsung announced that it has opened the throttle on mass producing the data storage industry's first 4-gigabyte DRAM (dynamic random access memory) package.

The memory processor is based on the second-generation High Bandwidth Memory (HBM2) interface, designed for use in high-performance computing, advanced graphics and network systems, as well as enterprise servers.

Seoul-based Samsung says its new HBM interface will bring more than seven times' faster performance than current DRAM.

 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel