Daily Tech Briefing: July 11, 2014

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2014-07-11 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Apple pointed finger at Google, while cooperating with FTC; The clock is ticking on Windows 7, Microsoft warns; IBM to spend $3 Billion to research the future of chips, systems; and more.

 
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Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

In April, Apple began refunding $32.5 million to consumers who had unknowingly made in-app purchases. This was after a January settlement between Apple and the Federal Trade Commission, which had made a complaint stating that Apple did not make it clear that once consumers entered their Apple password there was a 15-minute window open where purchases could be made without people having to re-enter their passwords.

However, Apple has not been eager to take full blame for this situation. Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell sent out a letter to members of the FTC, pointing out that people have also had issues with unauthorized purchases made in Android apps.

Microsoft recently published an online support document that details which of its software products are closing in on their end of support date. The most prominent product on the list is Windows 7.

Microsoft will end mainstream support for all editions of the best-selling OS, starting January 13, 2015. However, users will still be able to run Windows 7 for years to come. The company explained that Microsoft's mainstream support phase includes paid support, security updates, design changes and non-security hotfixes.

In January 2015 Windows 7 will move into the extended support phase, which lasts for 5 years and includes security updates at no cost and paid hotfix support.

IBM announced plans to spend $3 billion over the next five years in research and development projects to continue shrinking the current processor chip architecture to at least 7 nanometers. This money will also be used to fund more research into what will replace the traditional silicon chip architecture when it reaches its physical limitations.

Avast, a company which offers an Anti-Theft app that claims it can "thoroughly" wipe and "permanently delete and overwrite all files on a device," recently released a report revealing some of the risks involved with selling used smartphones.

he company explained that even in instances where consumers conscientiously deleted their data, the company was still able to find personal information left behind on Samsung Galaxy S2, S3 and S4 models, as well as phones from Motorola and HTC.

Thanks for watching, follow the links on this page to learn more about the stories mentioned in this broadcast, and check back every weekday for another Daily Tech Briefing from eWEEK.com

 
 
 

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