Daily Tech Briefing: July 3, 2014

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2014-07-03 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ARM unveils Juno platform for 64-Bit Android development; Microsoft tightens security on Outlook.com and OneDrive; Lenovo CEO says IBM x86 server deal will close this year; and more.

 

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Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

ARM and an open-source vendor consortium are aiming to speed up the adoption of 64-bit Android applications on upcoming mobile devices that will run a new version of Google's mobile operating system.

ARM and Linaro are rolling out a hardware development platform, code-named Juno that is designed to run a 64-bit edition of Android to enable developers and ecosystem partners to write software and tools for the upcoming Android-based tablets and smartphones.

This announcement is coming one week after Google announced the Android L Development Preview edition, which includes support for 64-bit APIs.

Microsoft is delivering on some of the promises it made late last year to harden its cloud services against cyber-spying. Outlook.com and OneDrive now have more layers of encryption, which make it harder for governments to access the data of private users.

This is part of the tech industry movement that started as a result of last year's National Security Agency spying scandal. Outlook.com now has Transport Layer Security encryption and Perfect Forward Secrecy, and OneDrive has PFS as well.

Lenovo executives have said that they expect to close the company's $2.3 billion deal to buy IBM's x86 server business by the end of the year. This is despite the fact that there have been national security concerns among U.S. regulators that reportedly have slowed the regulatory review process. At a July 2nd press conference in Hong Kong,

Lenovo CEO Yang Yuanging reportedly said that the company is still on track to complete the IBM deal as well as Lenovo's $2.9 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility from Google.

Microsoft has become the latest tech vendor to join the AllSeen Alliance, a consortium that is working to build an open platform for the Internet of things. This is a project of the Linux Foundation that is aimed at creating an open framework for the Internet of things, based on the AllJoyn open-source code originally developed by Qualcomm.

Thanks for watching, follow the links on this page to learn more about the stories mentioned in this broadcast. And check back every weekday for another Daily Tech Briefing from eWEEK.com

 
 
 

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