HPE Getting Developers Involved in Development of the Machine

By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2016-06-09 Print this article Print

DAILY VIDEO: HPE gives open-source developers early access to the Machine; star Cisco engineers resign after reorganization; the MEGABYTE Act seeks to control government software spending; and there's more.

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Read more about the stories in today's news:


Today's topics include HPE's development of a reworked data center computer architecture, Cisco's reorganization causing engineers to resign, the government's new act that will limit software spending and Lenovo's plan to improve its presence in the virtual reality sector.

Hewlett Packard Enterprise officials want to get open-source developers involved early with the development of the company's reworking of data center computer architectures that they are calling the Machine. At the tech vendor's Discover 2016 conference in Las Vegas June 7, HPE launched an open-source community page that will give developers access to a new set of tools that will enable them to start contributing to the code development for the Machine.

Officials said the technology completely rethinks data center IT as engineers shift the system architecture away from processors and toward memory. The system is being designed to handle the massive amounts of data that will be generated in the future due to such trends as cloud computing, big data analytics, the proliferation of mobile devices and the Internet of things.

Four Cisco Systems executives best known for leading the company's unique "spin-in" strategy that led to the development of products, including its answer to software-defined networking, have now become the latest officials to leave the giant networking vendor.

Mario Mazzola, Prem Jain, Luca Cafiero and Soni Jiandani—who had been nicknamed "MPLS" because of their initials and in apparent reference to the networking technology developed by Cisco—are the latest in a series of high-ranking executives to leave the company since Chuck Robbins took over as CEO 2015.

According to an internal memo sent by Robbins and obtained by The Wall Street Journal, the MPLS team has resigned and will leave the company June 17.

The federal government wastes a reported $4 billion a year by poorly managing software licenses. Sens. Bill Cassidy and Gary Peters hope to remedy this through an act with an admirable intention and acronym, the Making Electronic Government Accountable by Yielding Tangible Efficiencies Act, or the MEGABYTE Act.  

But although MEGABYTE made it on to the June 7 schedule of the Democratic Whip, along with 10 other bills, it doesn't appear to have received attention yet. Cassidy noted in his statement that, according to the non-partisan Government Accountability Office, a single office could save $181 million in taxpayer money each year.

Under a partnership that was announced June 7, Lenovo will gain access to Movidius' Myriad 2 Vision Processing Unit hardware and its custom computer vision algorithms for inclusion in VR hardware created and sold by Lenovo.

The Myriad 2 chip provides vision-based tasks such as head tracking, gesture recognition and blending multiple video streams into interactive VR video, while having a compact size and low power needs that allow it to be packed into handheld and head-worn devices.

The companies said that the first Lenovo products that use the Myriad 2 VPU are expected in the second half of 2016, with more details to come about the technology during the second annual Lenovo Tech World event on June 9 in San Francisco.


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