Qualcomm Develops Wireless Charging Tech for Devices Encased in Metal

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2015-07-31 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DAILY VIDEO: Qualcomm enables wireless charging of devices wrapped in metal; Dell considers spinning off SecureWorks business; Facebook intros new tool for keeping its users secure; and there's more. 

 
Cisco Extends Network Security Portfolio With Firepower 2100 Series

DAILY VIDEO: Cisco provides more firepower to security portfolio; Google to allow independent audit...

Harris Poll Shows Samsung Reputation Hurt by Note7 Smartphone Recall

DAILY VIDEO: Samsung's reputation hurt in latest Harris poll after Note7 debacle; Kubernetes...

New LG G6 Smartphone to Feature Side-by-Side FullVision Display

DAILY VIDEO: LG G6 smartphone getting side-by-side FullVision display; Azure SQL database threat...

Verizon, Yahoo Agree to Reduce Buyout Price to $4.55 Billion

DAILY VIDEO: Verizon negotiates down to $4.55B for Yahoo transaction; Congressional staffers see...

Google Tells RSA Show Audience How it Secures a Billion Android Users

DAILY VIDEO: How Google secures over a billion Android users; Amazon moves into teleconferencing...

Oracle Appeals Ruling in Java Infringement Dispute With Google

DAILY VIDEO: Oracle revives Java copyright infringement dispute with Google; Apple to Mark Smartphone...

Trump Administration Holds Back Executive Order on Cyber-Security

DAILY VIDEO: White House withholds cyber-security order for further revision; Cortana to help Windows...

Kaspersky Finds New Malware Designed to Hide in Memory, Steal Data

DAILY VIDEO: Kaspersky discovers new malware designed to stealthily steal data; Microsoft to shield...

U.S. Court Orders Google to Turn Over Data Stored on Overseas Servers

DAILY VIDEO: Federal court says Google must turn over data in foreign servers; Cisco report: mobile...

Leak of Windows 10 Cloud Suggests Microsoft Readying Chrome OS Fighter

DAILY VIDEO: Windows 10 Cloud leak points to potential Chrome OS fighter; TiVo's analytics pinpoint...



Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Today's topics include new wireless charging technology from Qualcomm, rumors of Dell's plans for its Secureworks business, a new security tool from Facebook and Amazon's proposal for enabling delivery drones to fly in low-level airspace.

Qualcomm developed a technology that will enable wireless charging for mobile devices with metal cases, an important step for an industry that is seeing more smartphones and tablets made with metal alloys. The company has taken its WiPower magnetic resonance technology and created a charging system that device makers can use when they design their mobile products. It will also be useful by other industries—including automobile and furniture makers that want to integrate wireless charging technologies into their products, according to Qualcomm officials.

Reports continue to circulate that Dell officials are interested in spinning out at least part of its SecureWorks security business--as well as other units--with an eye toward creating a federated  business model similar to that at storage giant EMC. Initial hints at the idea came two months ago, when Brenon Daly, an analyst with The 451 Group, wrote in a post on the firm's blog about rumors of Dell planning to sell a minority stake in SecureWorks in an initial public offering later this year.

Continuing its efforts to help keep users safe and secure on its social networking site, Facebook is launching its Security Checkup tool. The new tool includes account login status, login alerts and password safety features. Login status is an important part of account security at Facebook. Users can log in to the site from multiple locations and devices, but they can also forget that they are logged in. The Security Checkup tool shows users where they are logged in so that they can see when Facebook is running unused on one of their devices—or potentially notice a login that is unauthorized.

Amazon, which has been proposing and testing the idea of using unmanned drones to deliver packages to customers for several years, is now suggesting the use of specific sections of U.S. airspace that would allow delivery and other drone flights to be conducted. Amazon's latest idea is to designate airspace below 200 feet for drone flights to conduct aerial surveys, inspections or to take videos, while reserving airspace between 200 to 400 feet for delivery drones that are making their way over communities, according to a July 28 story by The Washington Post.

 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel