Qualcomm Develops Wireless Charging Tech for Devices Encased in Metal

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2015-07-31 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DAILY VIDEO: Qualcomm enables wireless charging of devices wrapped in metal; Dell considers spinning off SecureWorks business; Facebook intros new tool for keeping its users secure; and there's more. 

 
Avalanche Botnet Shut Down by International Law Enforcement Action

DAILY VIDEO: Avalanche botnet disabled by law enforcement; Google launches continuous testing service...

More than 1 Million Android Devices Infected by 'Gooligan' Trojan

DAILY VIDEO: 'Gooligans' malware infects more than 1.3 million Android devices; Firefox patched for...

Azure Cloud Flaw Posed Hacking Risk to RHEL Virtual Machines

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft Azure flaw posed RHEL hacking risk; Google explores use of machine learning to...

Microsoft Readying New Smartphone Models for Late 2017, Reports Say

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft readying new mobile device push in 2017, reports say; Cisco extends security...

San Francisco Transit Agency Gets Back Online After Ransomware Attack

DAILY VIDEO: Cyber-attack knocks out San Francisco transit system fare terminals; Cisco extends...

Recount in Wisconsin Unlikely to Reveal Vote System Fraud, Hacking

DAILY VIDEO: Election recount unlikely to reveal evidence of vote system hacking; Mimecast brings...

Microsoft Sets Sights on Building Practical Quantum Computer

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft Starts Quantum Computer Development Program; Cerber Ransomware Expands...

Symantec Buys Out Identity Protection Firm LifeLock for $2.3 Billion

DAILY VIDEO: Symantec acquires identity protection vendor LifeLock for $2.3 Billion; Oracle acquires...

Nvidia, OpenAI to Collaborate With Microsoft's AI Efforts

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft's AI efforts get a boost from Nvidia, Elon Musk's OpenAI; Mozilla introduces...

IBM Launches Security Services Headquarters in Massachusetts

DAILY VIDEO: IBM opens global headquarters for security services; IoT devices evolving rapidly as...



Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Today's topics include new wireless charging technology from Qualcomm, rumors of Dell's plans for its Secureworks business, a new security tool from Facebook and Amazon's proposal for enabling delivery drones to fly in low-level airspace.

Qualcomm developed a technology that will enable wireless charging for mobile devices with metal cases, an important step for an industry that is seeing more smartphones and tablets made with metal alloys. The company has taken its WiPower magnetic resonance technology and created a charging system that device makers can use when they design their mobile products. It will also be useful by other industries—including automobile and furniture makers that want to integrate wireless charging technologies into their products, according to Qualcomm officials.

Reports continue to circulate that Dell officials are interested in spinning out at least part of its SecureWorks security business--as well as other units--with an eye toward creating a federated  business model similar to that at storage giant EMC. Initial hints at the idea came two months ago, when Brenon Daly, an analyst with The 451 Group, wrote in a post on the firm's blog about rumors of Dell planning to sell a minority stake in SecureWorks in an initial public offering later this year.

Continuing its efforts to help keep users safe and secure on its social networking site, Facebook is launching its Security Checkup tool. The new tool includes account login status, login alerts and password safety features. Login status is an important part of account security at Facebook. Users can log in to the site from multiple locations and devices, but they can also forget that they are logged in. The Security Checkup tool shows users where they are logged in so that they can see when Facebook is running unused on one of their devices—or potentially notice a login that is unauthorized.

Amazon, which has been proposing and testing the idea of using unmanned drones to deliver packages to customers for several years, is now suggesting the use of specific sections of U.S. airspace that would allow delivery and other drone flights to be conducted. Amazon's latest idea is to designate airspace below 200 feet for drone flights to conduct aerial surveys, inspections or to take videos, while reserving airspace between 200 to 400 feet for delivery drones that are making their way over communities, according to a July 28 story by The Washington Post.

 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel