Researchers Develop Way to Unlock Smartphone With 2D Fingerprints

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2016-08-04 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DAILY VIDEO: University professor unlocks smartphone for law enforcement; Google initiates customer-supplied cloud data encryption keys; IBM launches X-Force Red crackerjack security team; and there's more.

 

 
Apple iPhone 7 Users Report 'Hissing' Noise That May Prove Innocuous

DAILY VIDEO: "Hissing" iPhone 7s reported, but that may be a normal noise; Microsoft delivers Version...

Google Smartphone, VR Headset Expected to Debut at Oct. 4 Event

DAILY VIDEO: Google expected to unveil smartphone, VR headset at Oct. 4 event; Ellison claims...

Samsung Says Green Charging Light Hallmark of Safe Note7 Handsets

DAILY VIDEO: Samsung Note7 recall update: How to ID a non-defective handset; Oracle launches a major...

Google to Roll Out Allo Messaging App on Sept. 21: Report

DAILY VIDEO: Google reportedly launching Allo messaging app Sept. 21; Intel, GE partner to make...

iPhone 7 Plus So Far More Popular Than iPhone 7

DAILY VIDEO: iPhone 7 sales patterns contrast with those of iPhone 6 and 6s; mobile carriers unveil...

Apple Says iPhone 7 Sales Start With Some Models Already Sold Out

DAILY VIDEO: Apple says some iPhone 7 models are already sold out; Qualcomm pushes for more dual...

Apple Says It's Fixed iOS 10 Bug That Disabled Some iPhones, iPads

DAILY VIDEO: Apple's new iOS 10 update disables iPhones, iPads for some users; Samsung to limit Note7...

Apple Delivers iOS 10 Ahead of iPhone 7 Arrival

DAILY VIDEO: Apple releases iOS 10 just before iPhone 7 arrives; official recall of Samsung Galaxy...

Google Working With Huawei to Build 7-Inch Tablet: Report

DAILY VIDEO: Google rumored to Be Planning Huawei-Built 7-Inch Tablet; Bing Update Asks Smarter...

Google to Label Sites That Don't Upgrade to HTTPS as 'Non-Secure

DAILY VIDEO: Google to start labeling as non-secure sites that use HTTP; Dell and HPE CEOs debate the...



Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Today's topics include a university professor’s discovery of an alternative way for law enforcement to unlock smartphones, Google’s initiation of new customer-supplied cloud data encryption keys, IBM’s X-Force Red security team that was created with the goal of identifying vulnerabilities in enterprise IT systems and Instagram’s introduction of its new “Stories” feature to make it more competitive with Snapchat.

Back in February, as Apple and the Federal Bureau of Investigation wrangled over the locked iPhone used by mass killer Syed Farook, more than one online commenter suggested using the finger of the deceased Farook to unlock the phone.

That wouldn't have worked because the skin of living people is conductive and that's part of what makes biometric phone locks work.

So explained Anil Jain, a distinguished professor of computer science and engineering at Michigan State University, who, with doctoral student Sunpreet Arora and postdoctoral student Kai Cao, figured out how to unlock the Samsung Galaxy S6 of a different dead man, using his inky fingerprints from a previous arrest.

Jain and Cao used special conductive paper, a 3D printer and an image-enhancing algorithm to create a replica of the victim’s fingerprint that was able to successfully unlock the phone.

Google this week announced general availability of an option that lets customers of its cloud services use their own keys to encrypt sensitive data stored online.

Google first introduced its Customer-Supplied Encryption Keys for Compute Engine in beta form last year. The feature enables enterprises to protect their data using encryption keys that are not owned or managed by Google.

The company claims it will only require and hold customer keys temporarily to fulfill requests such as starting a virtual machine or attaching a disk. Currently, Google's cloud platform encrypts all customer data stored on its servers by default, without the customer having to do anything to initiate the process.

IBM this week announced the creation of X-Force Red, a new elite security testing team consisting of security experts and ethical hackers familiar with a variety of industries including health care, financial services, retail, manufacturing and the public sector.

The new team will conduct penetration tests to try to uncover security vulnerabilities for IBM clients. Charles Henderson, a penetration testing expert and security professional with more than 20 years of experience in the information security industry, is the team’s leader.

Henderson, who is Global Head of Security Testing and X-Force Red for IBM Security, said he has been working on putting the X-Force Red team together since October 2015. The team will focus its vulnerability testing on four primary areas—applications, networks, hardware and the human resources that make up an organization’s workforce.

Instagram, borrowing a move from the Snapchat playbook, will soon introduce Instagram Stories, it announced in an Aug. 1 service update. Stories will feature an unlimited number of photos, videos and drawn doodles to tell a story, which will disappear after 24 hours.

The Stories won't appear in a user's grid or feed. Snapchat has attracted users by being in large part ephemeral and thus low-pressure, while Instagram has become dominated by ever more professional-looking photos.

The pressure of posting high-quality photos has led to a reduction in user activity—or to the practice in many cases of just posting once a day.

 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel