Tech Briefing: Lenovo Closes $2.91 Billion Deal for Motorola

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2014-10-31 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Lenovo closes $2.91 billion deal for Motorola; CEO John Chen has high hopes for BlackBerry Classic phone; IBM introduces new analytics software to battle cyber-crime; and more.

 
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Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Lenovo officials announced Oct. 30 that the company has completed its $2.91 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility, making the Chinese systems maker the world's third-largest smartphone vendor.

This comes 10 months after announcing its intent to buy Motorola from Google and less than a month after completing its $2.1 billion acquisition of IBM's x86 server business.

With the deal, Lenovo is getting not only Motorola's well-known brand, but also its lineup of smartphones, which includes the Moto X, Moto G, Moto E and Droid devices along with its future product roadmap.

In an open letter to current and former BlackBerry users, BlackBerry CEO John Chen laid out his case that his company's upcoming phone—the BlackBerry Classic—will include the features users already loved about its products, while adding improvements and refinements that will make the Classic even better.

For example, he touted the company's upcoming BlackBerry Classic enterprise handset, which the company hopes will bring back former users who want access to the enterprise-class features and security features that took advantage from earlier BlackBerry mobile phone models.

IBM has announced new high-speed analysis and criminal investigation software designed to uncover hidden cyber-crime threats buried deep inside massive volumes of corporate data.

IBM i2 Enterprise Insight Analysis search across a multitude of databases on corporate networks to find non-obvious relationships masked within hundreds of terabytes of data and trillions of objects in just seconds. This allows organizations to gain complete visibility into threats across the enterprise.

The Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission are suing AT&T Mobility for allegedly throttling down service speeds for at least 3.5 million mobile phone customers, despite contracts that allowed customers to enjoy unlimited data use.

The government is arguing that AT&T allegedly failed to adequately explain to customers that if they would reach a certain amount of data use in each billing period they could be subject to service slowdowns, the government argued.

 
 
 

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