PernixData Launches New Flash Hypervisor for SMBs

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2013-08-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

PernixData has released the first flash hypervisor aimed squarely at SMBs to optimize their storage data-movement performance.

There's now more evidence that due to big data workloads popping up all over the map, IT management software originally designed for large IT systems is trickling down to the midrange—and smaller—enterprise.

PernixData, a specialist in developing server-side management software for NAND flash media, on Aug. 27 released a new edition of its flash hypervisor aimed squarely at small and midsize businesses (SMBs) to optimize their storage data-movement performance.

The announcement was made on Day 2 of VMworld 2013.

In following up its announcement three weeks ago of the enterprise version of the first flash hypervisor, PernixData said its new SMB version supports up to four hosts and virtualizes them into a clustered acceleration tier.

Once a flash cluster is established, PernixData FVP enables any host to access the flash devices on any other host in the cluster. FVP is deployed transparently as a hypervisor-only module and, thus, does not have the limitations of guest OS agents or virtual appliances.

This procedure enables a point-and-click way to scale out storage performance independent of storage capacity for SMB environments. San Jose, Calif.-based PernixData claims FVP can be set up and operating in less than 20 minutes.

FVP supports all VMware products, including vCloud Director, Horizon View, vMotion, DRS, HA, Snapshot, VDP and Site Recovery Manager. This server-side package is the only product that supports full read and write acceleration across all virtual applications, PernixData said. Writes are replicated across all clustered hosts to ensure fault tolerance, if so desired.

Pricing for the PernixData FVP SMB edition, which includes licenses for up to four hosts, each with up to 2 processors and 1 flash device, is $9,999. It can run up to 100 virtual machines across a cluster.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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