Why BYOC Trend Comes With a Ready-Made New Market

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2013-10-06 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

BYOC describes individuals who have their own "personal clouds" or corporate employees empowered to use public or private third-party cloud services to perform certain job roles.

Hot on the heels of the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend is this one: bring your own cloud (BYOC).

Sigh. Another market-speaking acronym aimed to promote a new IT product or service?  Perhaps, but there is some substance here, not to mention a whole new market. This is because users now have the option to own a personal storage and collaboration cloud outside an enterprise's, and the idea is starting to gain traction.  

BYOC describes individuals who have their own "personal clouds" or corporate employees empowered to use public or private third-party cloud services to perform certain job roles. In the corporate version, BYOC involves the stitching together of enterprise and consumer software, both in the cloud and on premises, to get the job done.

New Products for a New Market

The news hook here is that a group of storage device makers came out this past week with new products that make it possible for an individual to store files in a desktop device the size of a toaster and then access, share, modify or distribute them from any device through a browser at any time. Sound familiar? It's an enterprise cloud, pared down to its simplest parts.

One of them involves disk drive and storage provider WD, which on Oct. 3 introduced its My Cloud product line. My Cloud units also have a mobile app for iOS and Android that allows users to view photos, stream video and access their files from anywhere on their smartphones or tablets. The mobile app also makes file sharing and collaborating possible, allowing customers to email files, share files as a link, and print and open files with third-party apps.

Additionally, the My Cloud mobile app integrates other public cloud services so that customers can transfer files between their Dropbox, SkyDrive and Google Drive public cloud accounts.

Terabytes of Personal Cloud Storage

In addition, new products from vendors such as Seagate (Seagate Central), Buffalo, LaCie and Synology provide terabytes of data storage with advanced security features and enough power to stream HD content to several devices simultaneously. Whether you're a small-business owner looking to better manage the growing mass of data being collected or a media junkie who wants access to all the movies, music and media humanly possible, one of these network-attached storage (NAS) devices is sure to do the job.

Make no mistake about it: These items are now selling—and already selling in volume—because they're all priced at $350 or less.

 

Seagate Central


 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger

Chris Preimesberger is Editor of Features & Analysis at eWEEK. Twitter: @editingwhiz

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel