Salesforce Connect Simplifies Enterprise App Data Integration

 
 
By eWEEK Staff  |  Posted 2015-12-04 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DAILY VIDEO: Salesforce Connect improves data integration for enterprise apps; VTech admits lack of database security opened door to hack; Microsoft's Cortana assists in unearthing Power BI insights; and there's more.

 
Avalanche Botnet Shut Down by International Law Enforcement Action

DAILY VIDEO: Avalanche botnet disabled by law enforcement; Google launches continuous testing service...

More than 1 Million Android Devices Infected by 'Gooligan' Trojan

DAILY VIDEO: 'Gooligans' malware infects more than 1.3 million Android devices; Firefox patched for...

Azure Cloud Flaw Posed Hacking Risk to RHEL Virtual Machines

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft Azure flaw posed RHEL hacking risk; Google explores use of machine learning to...

Microsoft Readying New Smartphone Models for Late 2017, Reports Say

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft readying new mobile device push in 2017, reports say; Cisco extends security...

San Francisco Transit Agency Gets Back Online After Ransomware Attack

DAILY VIDEO: Cyber-attack knocks out San Francisco transit system fare terminals; Cisco extends...

Recount in Wisconsin Unlikely to Reveal Vote System Fraud, Hacking

DAILY VIDEO: Election recount unlikely to reveal evidence of vote system hacking; Mimecast brings...

Microsoft Sets Sights on Building Practical Quantum Computer

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft Starts Quantum Computer Development Program; Cerber Ransomware Expands...

Symantec Buys Out Identity Protection Firm LifeLock for $2.3 Billion

DAILY VIDEO: Symantec acquires identity protection vendor LifeLock for $2.3 Billion; Oracle acquires...

Nvidia, OpenAI to Collaborate With Microsoft's AI Efforts

DAILY VIDEO: Microsoft's AI efforts get a boost from Nvidia, Elon Musk's OpenAI; Mozilla introduces...

IBM Launches Security Services Headquarters in Massachusetts

DAILY VIDEO: IBM opens global headquarters for security services; IoT devices evolving rapidly as...



Read more about the stories in today's news:

 
 
 

Today's topics include the Salesforce Connect data integration system, VTech's admission that lax database security led to its recent hack, Microsoft Cortana's role in discovering Power BI insights, and Google's denial of an accusation that it collects student data.

Cloud computing giant, Salesforce.com, recently unwrapped Salesforce Connect data integrator in hopes of making it easier for their users to work with data from a variety of applications.

Salesforce is leveraging the trend toward open standards by supporting API standards, such as OData (Open Data Protocol), which let developers integrate data from disparate applications.

Brian Goldfarb, senior vice president of app cloud marketing at Salesforce, noted that seamless integration between apps is more common in the consumer space, but something that is harder to achieve in the enterprise software market.

VTech Holdings is now admitting to at least one of the root causes behind the data breach that exposed personal information on millions of children and parents.

In an update to its FAQ about the breach on Dec. 1, VTech now admits that its database security was lax. The database weakness is related to a class of security vulnerability known as SQL injection.

These vulnerabilities allow attackers to directly interact with a Website’s database and have been the source of numerous data breaches.

Power BI, Microsoft's cloud-powered business intelligence (BI) and analytics tool, is taking a step beyond typed, natural-language searches.

Now, as part of a public preview, users can explore Power BI data with the help of Cortana, the voice-driven virtual assistant technology bundled with Windows 10.

The new Cortana-Power BI integration "enables anyone to get answers directly from their key business data in a more helpful, proactive, and natural way," Marcus Ash, group program manager for Microsoft Cortana, announced on Dec. 1.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has accused Google of deceptively collecting and mining personal data of school children, a claim that Google vigorously denied Dec. 2.

In a complaint filed with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission this week, the EFF said Google collects, stores and analyzes data on the Internet sites that students visit, the search terms they use, the results they click on, the videos they watch and their passwords.

However, Jonathan Rochelle, director of Google Apps for Education, said the company remains confident that its tools comply with both its own student privacy pledge and the law.

 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel