Alienware HiveMind

 
 
By Anne Chen  |  Posted 2005-11-21 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Alienwares HiveMind 2525

Best known for its hard-core gaming rigs, Alienware entered the SMB server arena with the introduction of the 2U (3.5-inch) HiveMind 2525 server.

This server—which displays an alien on the chassis—will likely appeal mainly to gaming enthusiasts who are familiar with the Alienware brand. However, our tests show the HiveMind 2525 has enough business-minded capabilities to win over many other IT managers. In fact, if money is no object, no server will have more of a gee-whiz factor than the HiveMind 2525, which shipped in August.

The rack-mount server comes with dual Intel Xeon processors that will provide an upgrade path to smaller organizations considering the transition from 32-bit to 64-bit.

The HiveMind 2525 server supports up to 2.4TB of SATA (Serial ATA) or 1.8TB of SCSI hard drive storage. It also supports as much as 12GB of ECC (error-correcting code) DDR2 memory.

We test-drove a HiveMind 2525 equipped with dual 2.8GHz Intel Xeon processors with 2MB of cache and an 800MHz front-side bus. The HiveMind included 6GB of DDR2 RAM and was running the Windows Server 2003 operating system. In this configuration, the server costs about $5,000.

Alienware executives are the first to admit that their hardware isnt bargain-priced but claim the customer support the company provides to SMBs is well worth the premium.

Organizations looking for a server to handle mission-critical applications such as CRM and data warehousing applications will find the HiveMind 2525 a good fit, and the server can also be used for messaging and Web hosting purposes. But cost-conscious organizations will probably find a better deal in a server with a little less character.

Next Page: Gateways E-9220T.



 
 
 
 
As a senior writer for eWEEK Labs, Anne writes articles pertaining to IT professionals and the best practices for technology implementation. Anne covers the deployment issues and the business drivers related to technologies including databases, wireless, security and network operating systems. Anne joined eWeek in 1999 as a writer for eWeek's eBiz Strategies section before moving over to Labs in 2001. Prior to eWeek, she covered business and technology at the San Jose Mercury News and at the Contra Costa Times.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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