Prospects of Creative Work Boost Interest in IT Careers Among Teens

Prospects of Creative Work Boost Interest in IT Careers Among Teens
Most Teens View IT as Viable Career Choice
Enthusiasm for Tech Remains High
First-Hand Associations With Industry Pros Lacking Among Teens
Video Game and App Design Cited as Popular Tech Job Niches
Compensation and Creativity Lead Tech Career Advantages
Rewarding Outcomes Sought via IT Vocations
Isolation and Lack of Needed Skills Could Derail Ambitions
Computer, Software Skills Emerge as Priorities
Teens Take Advantage of Abundance of IT Career Advice Options
Automation Looms Large as Job Security Concern
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Prospects of Creative Work Boost Interest in IT Careers Among Teens

An increasing percentage of teenagers are considering a career in IT, according to a recent survey from CompTIA. In fact, nearly all of the young survey respondents said they either “love” or “like” tech, and that they even troubleshoot IT issues for their family members and friends. If they end up actually pursuing tech as a vocation, the majority of survey respondents indicated that they expect to be paid well. But most are also seeking opportunities to be creative while tackling interesting work assignments. In addition, they would like to leverage IT to “help people.” More than 1,000 U.S. teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 took part in the research. This slide show presents highlights of the survey, with charts provided courtesy of CompTIA.

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Most Teens View IT as Viable Career Choice

Four of five teenage males will either “definitely” or “probably” consider a career in IT, and 62 percent of teenage females feel the same way. This is up from 72 percent of males and 51 percent of females who said this in 2015.

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Enthusiasm for Tech Remains High

CompTIA reports that 96 percent of teens either “love” or “like” technology. In fact, 92 percent help family and friends troubleshoot tech issues.

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First-Hand Associations With Industry Pros Lacking Among Teens

Only 28 percent of survey respondents actually know someone who works in tech. One-third of male teens said they know someone (like a family member or friend) who works in IT, while just one-quarter of female teens said they do.

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Video Game and App Design Cited as Popular Tech Job Niches

Nearly one-half of survey respondents said they are interested in designing video games for a living. More than two of five said they’re interested in designing apps for smartphones.

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Compensation and Creativity Lead Tech Career Advantages

About two-thirds of survey respondents said they believe IT jobs pay well. Nearly three of five said tech jobs provide opportunities to be creative.

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Rewarding Outcomes Sought via IT Vocations

According to CompTIA’s survey, 53 percent of teens feel that a tech career would lead to “interesting work.” Just over one-half said they’re interested in opportunities to “use technology to help people.”

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Isolation and Lack of Needed Skills Could Derail Ambitions

Concerns about “working alone sitting in front of a computer all day” were expressed by 43 percent of survey respondents, when asked about their negative impressions of IT as an occupation. About one-third also voiced reservations about the perceived need to be good at math and science, along with the potential to struggle with “difficult, complicated work.”

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Computer, Software Skills Emerge as Priorities

Commanding the “basic” skills of using a computer is considered to be an “important” trait among 93 percent of survey respondents. Skills related to general software/app usage are considered important among 87 percent of survey respondents, while 85 percent indicate that data skills are important.

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Teens Take Advantage of Abundance of IT Career Advice Options

In seeking career guidance about tech, 54 percent of teens go to their teachers and career counselors at school. Nearly one-half seek guidance from career fairs/information sessions, and 45 percent turn to their parents and family members for this advice.

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Automation Looms Large as Job Security Concern

More than one-half of survey respondents said they are concerned about losing a job in the future due to automation. Only three of 10 teenage girls surveyed and 35 percent of boys said they are not concerned about this.

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